Showing posts with label Seasonal Flu Vaccine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Seasonal Flu Vaccine. Show all posts

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Weekend Reading - Baby Boomers and the Flu



Baby Boomers and the Flu 
Did you know that you are more susceptible to flu-related complications if you're over 65, living with chronic liver disease, or viral hepatitis? Yep, I knew it too. 

Currently information on this blog is aimed at people living with or treating hepatitis C, for the most part that is the baby boomer generation; born between 1946 to1964. 

Speaking of baby boomers, if you haven't read the CDC's eye- opening report on last years flu season, it was reported 80,000 flu-related deaths occurred in the US, the highest in 40 years. The death rate among young baby boomers, aged 50 to 64 were shocking as well; 
"Death rates were highest in the over-65 age group, which is typical, but the second most affected group comprised those aged 50 to 64 years old; normally, the second highest death rates occur in children, from birth through age 4 years. The ferociousness of the flu season overall, combined with above-average impacts on younger baby boomers, made 2017-2018 one for the record books."
Read the article: Flu Season 2017-2018: A Look at What Happened and What's to Come, CDC report, here. Or read this more recent article, updated Oct 19, 2018: 80,000 Americans died of the flu last winter.That’s more than the number killed in traffic collisions, from gun violence, or from opioid overdoses.

Liver Disease & The Flu
As we age our immune system is less effective in fighting infections, and new infections can have a severe impact on the liver. This can be especially serious for liver transplant recipients and people who have cirrhosis. Flu-related complications could develop into bronchitis or pneumonia, which in rare cases can also be fatal.

Even though the flu vaccine won’t keep everyone from getting sick, it helps prevent serious flu complications. For instance people over 65 who were vaccinated had a lower rate of flu-related death, according to a 2017 study, found on the CDC's website.
"Flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized flu patients; with the greatest benefits being observed among people 65 years of age and older."
In The News
Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot
October 14, 2018
"I figured [the flu] was something that's dangerous to the elderly and the young, not somebody who is healthy and in their 30s," says Hinderliter, who is 39 and the director of government affairs at the St. Louis Realtors association
"Turns out, I was wrong," he says
Read the article, here.....

Should I or Shouldn't?
September 27, 2018
"People say they never had the flu until they got the shot. That argument doesn’t hold water. Either you got your shot too late, you got a strain of the flu that isn’t covered by the vaccine, or you had a one-day immune response which may make you feel like crap for the day, but isn’t anywhere like having the flu. If you are over 65, high dose flu shots are recommended, and some people feel a bit low and fluish the next day. This is not the flu – it is an immune system reaction"
Read the article: The Flu Shot Debate, written by HCV advocate Lucinda Porter.

CDC Information
People 65 years and older should get a flu shot and not a nasal spray vaccine.
They can get any flu vaccine approved for use in that age group with no preference for any one vaccine over another. There are regular flu shots that are approved for use in people 65 and older and there also are two vaccines designed specifically for people 65 and older:
High Dose Flu Vaccine:
The “high dose vaccine” contains 4 times the amount of antigen as a regular flu shot. It is associated with a stronger immune response following vaccination (higher antibody production). Results from a clinical trial of more than 30,000 participants showed that adults 65 years and older who received the high dose vaccine had 24% fewer influenza infections as compared to those who received the standard dose flu vaccine. The high dose vaccine has been approved for use in the United States since 2009.
Learn more about high dose flu vaccine here.

Adjuvanted Flu Vaccine:
The adjuvanted flu vaccine, Fluad, is made with MF59 adjuvant an additive that creates a stronger immune response to vaccination. In a Canadian observational study of 282 people aged 65 years and older conducted during the 2011-12 season, Fluad was 63% more effective than regular-dose unadjuvanted flu shots. There are no randomized studies comparing Fluad with Fluzone High-Dose. This vaccine was available for the first time in the United States during the 2016-2017 season. Learn more about adjuvanted flu vaccine here.

For Adults with LIVER DISEASE: Important information about a dangerous infection
If you have chronic liver disease, you are more likely to have serious complications if you get pneumococcal disease

Get pneumococcal vaccines 
People who are 65 years of age and older should also be up to date with pneumococcal vaccination to protect against pneumococcal disease, such as pneumonia, meningitis, and bloodstream infections. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Pneumococcal pneumonia is an example of a serious flu-related complication that can cause death. 

You can get the pneumococcal vaccine your provider recommends when you get the flu vaccine.

CDC - Got Questions?
Flu vaccines recommended this season.

Detailed flu and flu vaccine information specific to the current flu season

If you have HIV, you are at high risk of serious influenza-related complications and should get an injectable influenza vaccine (a flu shot). 

Stay healthy!
Tina

Monday, October 1, 2018

October Newsletters - Should Liver Disease Patients Get Screened For Liver Cancer?

Welcome folks, October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month! Check out this years Liver Cancer Awareness Campaign aimed at encouraging individuals with an increased risk for liver cancer to receive ongoing screening, launched by the American Liver Foundation (ALF) and Bayer Healthcare.

Should Liver Disease Patients Get Screened For Liver Cancer?
Yes! Experts suggest liver disease patients should be screened for cancer every 6 months, according to Global Liver Institute; There is increasing evidence that identifying persons at risk for liver cancer due to chronic hepatitis B or C infection, fatty liver disease, or other causes and enrolling them in a regular program of surveillance using blood tests and ultrasound examinations of the liver every 6 months significantly increases the number of cancers that are found at early stages and substantially improves the survival of persons diagnosed with liver cancer," said Lewis Roberts, MB ChB, PhD., Mayo Clinic. 
Read the article, here... 

Links
Find out if you're at risk for liver cancer, join an online support group, or learn more about liver disease and the awareness campaign in ALF's monthly newsletter; Liver Lowdown.

On This Blog
Sift through current Liver Cancer and Hepatitis C research articles

Liver Cancer After Treatment For Hepatitis C 
Research demonstrates that while SVR markedly reduced liver-related complications and liver cancer, some long-term risk for liver cancer remained in those who were cured of Hepatitis C. But after direct-acting antiviral therapy does the risk of developing liver cancer increase? Research is saying no, check out an index of articles here..... 

Fatty Liver Disease 
Watch videos, or review research in this current collection of articles 

Elsewhere
Over years or decades, chronic hepatitis B or C virus infection, heavy alcohol consumption, fat accumulation in the liver and other causes of liver injury can lead to development of liver cirrhosis and HCC. A majority of liver cancer cases in Asia and Africa are attributable to hepatitis B, while chronic hepatitis C appears to be the major risk factor in Western countries, according to the guidelines. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity seems to be a growing cause.

AASLD practice guidelines can be downloaded, here... 

Video
Video: Recognizing Liver Cancer Risk Factors

Newsletters
Here is this month's newsletters with the most recent updates about viral hepatitis.

HCV Advocate
The HCV Advocate newsletter is a valuable resource designed to provide the hepatitis C community with monthly updates on events, clinical research, and education.

HepCBC - Weekly Review
HepCBC is a Canadian non-profit organization offering information about HCV awareness, testing, treatment and care.
Here's the latest issue of the Weekly Bull.

The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force
The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force is a city-wide network of service providers and advocates concerned with hepatitis C and related issues. The groups come together to learn, share information and resources, network, and identify hepatitis C related needs in the community. Committees form to
work on projects in order to meet needs identified by the community.

October - Liver Cancer Awareness Month
Review all news updates.

HCV Action
HCV Action brings together hepatitis C health professionals from across the patient pathway with the pharmaceutical industry and patient representatives to share expertise and good practice.
HCV Action e-update

World Hepatitis Alliance
We run global campaigns, convene high-level policy events, build capacity and pioneer global movements, ensuring people living with viral hepatitis guide every aspect of our work.
View Recent Newsletters 

Hepatitis NSW
We provide information, support, referral and advocacy for people affected by viral hepatitis in NSW. We also provide workforce development and education services both to prevent the transmission of viral hepatitis and to improve services for those affected by it.
Latest issue of The Champion

GI & Hepatology News
Over 17,000 gastroenterologists and hepatologists rely on GI & Hepatology News every month to cover the world of medicine with breaking news, on-site medical meeting coverage, and expert perspectives both in print and online. 
View all updates here....

Hep-Your Guide to Hepatitis
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis. Offering unparalleled editorial excellence since 2010, Hep and HepMag.com are the go-to source for educational and social support for people living with hepatitis.
View - all issues
Read the news

Hepatitis Victoria
Hepatitis Victoria is the peak not-for-profit community organisation working across the state for people affected by or at risk of viral hepatitis.
View the Latest Newsletter, or relax and listen to a short podcasts interviewing health experts and practioners on topics related to viral hepatitis - come have a listen!

British Liver Trust
The British Liver Trust is the leading UK liver disease charity for adults – we provide information and support; increase awareness of how liver disease can be prevented and promote early diagnosis; fund and champion research and campaign for better services. 
View Recent Newsletters, here.

The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable
The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable (NVHR) is national coalition working together to eliminate hepatitis B and C in the United States.
View all NVHR newsletters

The Hepatitis C Trust
The Hepatitis C Trust is run by patients with the goal of eliminating HCV in the United Kingdom. The Trust’s mission is to reverse the rapidly increasing death toll caused by hepatitis C in the UK until no-one dies from this preventable and treatable disease and, ultimately, it is all but eradicated in this country.
View all newsletters

National Institutes of Health
A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Latest Newsletter

Blog Updates
Health Affairs Blog
Health Affairs Blog is a vehicle for commentary and analysis on health policy and issues affecting health and health care. The Blog features posts from noted health policy experts and commentators from a wide variety of perspectives, as well as regular Health Affairs contributors and staff.

Karen Hoyt is devoted to offering support and accurate information to people coping with the effects of hepatitis C.
Lucinda Porter is a nurse, speaker, advocate and patient devoted to increasing awareness about hepatitis C.
Latest blog entry

Hep 
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis.
Latest blog updates

Life Beyond Hep C is where faith, medical resources and patient support meet, helping Hep C patients and their families navigate through the entire journey of Hep C.
Latest blog entry

Canadian Liver Foundation 
We strive to improve prevention and the quality of life of those living with liver disease by advocating for better screening, access to treatment, and patient care.
Latest blog entry

Hepatitis B Foundation 
The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide.
Latest blog entry

HepatitisC.net
At HepatitisC.net we empower patients and caregivers to take control of Hepatitis C by providing a platform to learn, educate, and connect with peers and healthcare professionals.
Latest blog entry

Healthy You
The Risk of Alternative Cancer Treatments 
By Jane E. Brody
Avoiding evidence-based treatments in favor of untested ones can contribute to higher death rates
In a recent study by researchers at the Yale School of Medicine of 281 patients with potentially curable cancers of the breast, lung, colon-rectum or prostate that had not yet spread beyond their site of origin, the use of alternative medicine in lieu of conventional cancer treatments resulted in an overall death rate two and a half times higher than the rate experienced by patients getting standard therapies....

5 Reasons You May Be at Risk for Liver Disease
Dr. Saleh Alqahtani, director of clinical liver research for Johns Hopkins Medicine, notes that you shouldn’t wait for symptoms to appear to begin paying attention to the possibility of liver disease.

HealthWise: A Buffet of Health Information | Lucinda Porter, RN 
September 27, 2018
Last month, I wrote about hepatitis C and sugar. Someone asked me if this month I’d discuss artificial sweeteners. Since there isn’t as much research on the impact of artificial sweeteners and the liver, I wasn’t sure I could fill an entire column. However, I’ve been accumulating bits of health news that I have wanted to share, so this month will be a buffet of health information. Hopefully, everyone will find something of interest. However, in this case, you may leave the buffet with a list of foods you don’t want to pile on your plate.

Read both articles written by Lucinda Porter, RN: 
 HealthWise: A Buffet of Health Information and Healthwise: Hepatitis C and Sugar

AGA Journals
How Many Cases of Drug-Induced Liver Injury Are Caused by Herbal and Dietary Supplements?
Herbal and dietary supplement-induced liver injury is more severe than other types of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), and re-exposure is more likely, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Increasing awareness of the hepatoxic effects of herbal and dietary supplements could help physicians make earlier diagnoses

The Flu & You
Think You Don't Need A Flu Shot? Here Are 5 Reasons To Change Your Mind

October 01, 2018
2017 to 2018 flu strains hit the very young and elderly especially hard; poor vaccine/strain match-up.

Upcoming Liver Meeting® 2018
San Francisco, CA.
November 9-13, 2018.

Updates
On This Blog

AASLD - On Twitter
@AASLDtweets
#LiverMtg18

Accepted Abstracts
Now Available
The Liver Meeting® 2018

Late-breaking Abstracts
Late-breaking abstracts are available to the public on the AASLD website in early November, and are published in the December issue of HEPATOLOGY

Thanks for stopping by!
Tina

Monday, September 17, 2018

Experimental nasal influenza vaccine tested in kids, teens

Monday, September 17, 2018
Experimental nasal influenza vaccine tested in kids, teens
NIH-supported Phase 1 trial of potential broadly protective vaccine.

An early-stage clinical trial testing the safety and immune-stimulating ability of an experimental nasal influenza vaccine in healthy 9- to 17-year-old children and teens has begun enrolling participants at a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) site at Saint Louis University, Missouri. The VTEU is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Annual vaccination against influenza is recommended for everyone over six months of age. However, because the flu virus changes from year to year, vaccines must be reformulated annually to take account of those changes. When mismatches occur, vaccine effectiveness may suffer. “We are hopeful that newer kinds of influenza vaccines, such as the candidate being tested in this trial, will provide protection even if their components do not precisely match the currently circulating influenza virus strains,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.

Principal investigator Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., leads the clinical trial, which will enroll 50 participants. Half will receive the candidate nasal vaccine and the other half will receive a dose of inactive saline solution delivered as nasal spray. Neither the study staff nor volunteers will know whether a participant has received the experimental vaccine or placebo saline solution. All volunteers will receive an intramuscular injection of a licensed, quadrivalent seasonal influenza vaccine three months after receiving the initial nasal vaccine or placebo. An important objective of the study is to determine whether the combination of the licensed and experimental vaccine leads to broader protection against influenza viruses compared with the licensed vaccine alone. Investigators will perform an array of tests on volunteer blood samples at four time points following the first vaccination as well as three weeks after the second vaccination. They will look for evidence of immune responses from antibody-producing cells as well as from the cellular arm of the immune system.

The investigational vaccine, developed by FluGen, Inc. of Madison, Wisconsin, is made from a strain of seasonal influenza virus (H3N2) that has been genetically designed to replicate only once in the body. Studies in animals showed that the “single replication” virus does not cause disease but nevertheless prompted a robust immune response akin to that of a natural influenza infection. Investigators hypothesize that volunteers who receive the candidate vaccine will have a robust immune response not only against H3N2 strains that match those in the vaccine but also against influenza strains that are mismatched to the vaccine strain. A previous Phase 1 trial of this candidate vaccine in healthy adults showed that it was safe and generated a robust immune response and a Phase 2 trial in healthy adults is currently underway (that trial is not supported by NIAID.)

For more information about this trial of an experimental influenza vaccine in older children and adolescents, visit clinicaltrials.gov and search on identifier NCT03553940. The VTEUs are funded by NIAID through contract number HHSN272201300021.

NIAID conducts and supports research — at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide — to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID website.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

Monday, September 10, 2018

HCV Newsletters & Updates: Obesity in liver disease, Nasal spray for opioid overdose and Fast-acting flu drug

HCV Newsletters & Updates
Welcome, check out the latest news, review this months collection of newsletters, and finish off by reading a handful of well written blogs focused on living well with hep B or C.

In The News
MSF and groups call for end to Gilead’s hepatitis C drug monopoly in Europe which blocks access 
--Pharmaceutical company Gilead has a patent monopoly on hepatitis C drug sofosbuvir in Europe
--The patent results in exorbitant prices, meaning people are unable to afford treatment
--MSF and other organisations are urging the European Patent Office to overturn the patent in a hearing this week.

With an award-winning newsroom, STAT gives you indispensable insights and exclusive stories on the technologies, personalities, power brokers, and political forces driving massive changes in the life science industry — and a revolution in human health.
Fast-acting flu drug shows strong potential - An experimental, fast-acting flu drug showed strong promise in two newly published trials — but it also led to some surprising and even concerning results. The drug cut the time people were sick with flu symptoms by just over a day, but didn’t make people feel better faster than Tamiflu.

Reuters
California-based Opiant earlier this year was awarded a $7.4 million grant by the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse for the development of a nasally-applied version of overdose treatment nalmefene.

Associated Press 
Doctors explore lifting barriers to living organ donation
WASHINGTON — Surgeons turned down Terra Goudge for the liver transplant that was her only shot at surviving a rare cancer. Her tumor was too advanced, they said — even though Goudge had a friend ready to donate, no matter those odds.

HepCBC 
HepCBC is a Canadian non-profit organization offering awareness with basic information about HCV and a weekly digest of news.
Read the latest issue of the highly successful Weekly Bull.

September Updates
Hepatology - Top Story From Healio 
Healio features the industry’s best news reporting, dynamic multimedia, question-and-answer columns, educational activities in a variety of formats, blogs, and peer-reviewed journals.

HCV NEXT September/October Issue - The following articles appeared in this months issue of HCV NEXT, published online over at Healio

September 7, 2018
Physicians and researchers have noted the increase in liver disease over the last couple decades, especially nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, correlates significantly…

NATAP
NATAP is a New York State non-profit corporation with 501(c)3 Federal tax-exempt status. Our mission is to educate individuals about HIV and Hepatitis treatments and to advocate on the behalf of all people living with HIV/AIDS and HCV. Our efforts in these areas are conducted on local, national, and international levels.
Global Hepatitis Summit A Few Selected Highlights 
Reported by Jules Levin, NATAP
In June the Global Hepatitis Summit took place in Toronto. Here are 3 selected talks highlighted of particular interest to me. The first talk by Andrew Hill he says we have a bleak scenario regarding the possibility of global HCV elimination. He says in many countries new HCV infections outstrip HCV cures and new diagnoses. New diagnoses are much lower in all poorer countries compared to high income countries. Screening is too low, all of which he uses to say the outlook is bleak for global HCV elimination unless we make changes.

The 2nd talk I chose to highlight was by Maria Prims from the Netherlands where she reports high HCV infection & reinfection rates among people taking PrEP to prevent HIV infection. She highlights an increasing HCV incidence among MSM. 376 started PrEP either daily or on demand and there were 12 HCV infections: 6 new infections & 6 reinfections.

The 3rd report below is on the use of a new broader type of model in India for HCV screening & care. A more comprehensive clinic model where IDUs can under 1 roof get a variety of services for IDU and HCV care. Sunil Solomon highlights how big & diverse the HCV epidemic is India, much bigger even only among IDUs compared to the entire HCV epidemic in Western Europe. 
Read it here...…

In Case You Missed It
'A long life with HIV' is now available to read online. The booklet provides information on living well with HIV as you get older, including things you can do to look after your health, health issues and preparing for the future.

Sept 4, 2018
Inovio Pharmaceuticals (NSDQ:INO) and its partner, GeneOne Life Science (KSE:011000), said today that the companies have dosed the first patient in a Phase I study designed to test a preventive vaccine against hepatitis C infection. The companies plan to recruit 24 study participants to evaluate Inovio’s GLS-6150 candidate. Participants will include people who have a sustained virologic response following treatment for Hep. C, as well as healthy controls. They are slated to receive one of two doses of vaccine, administered intra-dermally and followed by electroporation with Inovio’s Cellectra device.

Risk of Liver Cancer in Patients with NAFLD 
(Reuters Health) - People with advanced cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may need to be monitored for liver cancer, a large U.S. study suggests.

Vosevi Beats Hepatitis C Regardless of Drug Resistance 
In a recent study of people whose previous hep C regimen failed to cure their infection, Vosevi cured almost all of them.

Will an opt-out organ transplant law save lives?
The recent decision in England to change the organ donation law from voluntary consent (opt-in) to presumed consent (opt-out) highlighted the debate around the best approach to organ donation.

Routine oral care to treat gum disease may improve cognitive function in cirrhosis patients
Routine oral care to treat gum disease may play a role in reducing inflammation and toxins in the blood and improving cognitive function in people with liver cirrhosis.

In The Journals 
Hepatitis B Virus and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Journal of Viral Hepatitis

Chronic Hepatitis C Association with Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Risk in the Era of DAA Therapy.
Most likely, DAA treatment and subsequently SVR achievement decrease cardiovascular risk. This fact is another reason for early treatment of patients, including those with a lower grade of liver fibrosis. Yet, chronic hepatitis C treatment remains inaccessible not only in developing countries but also in countries with high quality of life..

Newsletters
HCV Advocate
The HCV Advocate newsletter is a valuable resource designed to provide the hepatitis C community with monthly updates on events, clinical research, and education.
In this month’s HCV Advocate newsletter, the following noteworthy articles are available to read and educate:
-SnapShots by Alan Franciscus Risk factors, mortality, and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes—A. Rawshani, et. al.
-Incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after direct antiviral therapy for HCV in patients with cirrhosis included in surveillance programs—P. Nahom, et. al.
-Safety and efficacy of ledipasvir‐sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in children ages 6‐11—K. F. Murry, et. al
Briefly……..
-Commentary: A review of the risk of hepatitis B and C transmission through biting or spitting—H. Pintilie, et. al.
-Hepatitis C virus infection in children in the era of direct-acting antivirals—M. Pawlowska, et. al
HealthWise – A Buffet of Health Information – as the title of the article implies, Lucinda discusses the various substances that may or may not be good for your health.
Hepatitis Headlines – Three interesting news stories about hepatitis C that our readers will find interesting including heart transplants, eliminating hepatitis in the U.S. and WHO and HCV treatment guidelines.
Hep C 101 – Overview of Hepatitis C by Alan Franciscus – A new series of article for people who are new to hepatitis C or for those people who want basic information.
What’s Up – We’ve updated several of the HCV Advocate Factsheets. Use the links provided in this section to get current information on several subjects that relate to Hep C, including nutrition, alcohol, co-infection, and motherhood.
Watch our patient video about treating and curing HCV. 

The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force
The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force is a city-wide network of service providers and advocates concerned with hepatitis C and related issues. The groups come together to learn, share information and resources, network, and identify hepatitis C related needs in the community. Committees form to work on projects in order to meet needs identified by the community.
Review all news updates.

HCV Action
HCV Action brings together hepatitis C health professionals from across the patient pathway with the pharmaceutical industry and patient representatives to share expertise and good practice.
HCV Action e-update

World Hepatitis Alliance
We run global campaigns, convene high-level policy events, build capacity and pioneer global movements, ensuring people living with viral hepatitis guide every aspect of our work.
View Recent Newsletters 
World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA) presents hepVoice, a monthly magazine with updates on the latest projects, news from WHA members and key developments in the field of hepatitis.

GI & Hepatology News
Over 17,000 gastroenterologists and hepatologists rely on GI & Hepatology News every month to cover the world of medicine with breaking news, on-site medical meeting coverage, and expert perspectives both in print and online. 
Hot topics
Amy Karon MDedge News 
Modest alcohol consumption was associated with significantly less improvement in steatosis and significantly lower odds of NASH resolution.
View all updates here....

Hep-Your Guide to Hepatitis
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis. Offering unparalleled editorial excellence since 2010, Hep and HepMag.com are the go-to source for educational and social support for people living with hepatitis.
View - all issues
Read the news

Hepatitis Victoria
Hepatitis Victoria is the peak not-for-profit community organisation working across the state for people affected by or at risk of viral hepatitis.
Latest Podcast: Karen Hoyt a HEP Hero and she is unique in being our first international recipient!
Speaking from Oklahoma in the United States, Karen talks about her diagnosis with hepatitis C and how she experienced the full gamut of conditions leading to a liver transplant.



View the Latest Newsletter, or relax and listen to a short podcasts interviewing health experts and practioners on topics related to viral hepatitis - come have a listen!

British Liver Trust
The British Liver Trust is the leading UK liver disease charity for adults – we provide information and support; increase awareness of how liver disease can be prevented and promote early diagnosis; fund and champion research and campaign for better services. 
News: Less Survivable Cancer Taskforce calls for government to double the survival rate of deadliest cancers by 2029
The combined five-year survival rate for people with either liver, brain, lung, oesophageal, pancreatic or stomach cancers stands is currently just 14%. Today, six charities …
View Recent Newsletters, here.

The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable
The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable (NVHR) is national coalition working together to eliminate hepatitis B and C in the United States.
View all NVHR newsletters

The Hepatitis C Trust
The Hepatitis C Trust is run by patients with the goal of eliminating HCV in the United Kingdom. The Trust’s mission is to reverse the rapidly increasing death toll caused by hepatitis C in the UK until no-one dies from this preventable and treatable disease and, ultimately, it is all but eradicated in this country.

National Institutes of Health
A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
September Newsletter
Topics
Body Odor May Be Sign of Disease
Breathe Easier
Dealing with Bad Air Quality

Harvard Health
Lipoprotein(a) is a fatty particle in the blood that invades artery walls, causing atherosclerosis. Also known as Lp(a), the particles are similar to “bad” LDL cholesterol molecules but with an extra protein attached. High blood levels of Lp(a)—which is largely determined by genetics—may explain some unexpected, premature heart attacks. Widespread testing for Lp(a) is not recommended because both the prevalence and the definition of what constitutes a dangerously high level are not yet clear. In addition, there are no FDA-approved treatments proved to lower heart disease risk in people with high Lp(a) levels.

Inspirational Bloggers
Karen Hoyt is devoted to offering support and accurate information to people coping with the effects of hepatitis C.
I hear a lot from people seeking help for autoimmune liver disease. Trying to figure it out is hard, but most symptoms are the same as any type of liver disease. I know, we can’t lump them all into one specific area, but they are in the same region.

Lucinda K. Porter
Lucinda Porter is a nurse, speaker, advocate and patient devoted to increasing awareness about hepatitis C.
Latest blog entry: Happiness: Purging Self-Help Advice

Hep 
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis.
Latest blog entry: By Connie M. Welch
Patient Experience Living With Cirrhosis With John M., Part 2 Part 2 of Connie Welch’s interview with John M, a patient with hepatitis C and cirrhosis, who was successfully treated with Harvoni.

By Greg Jefferys -How Big Pharma Corrupts Health Services 
A look at how bribing bureaucrats and buying doctors brings about bad outcomes for public health.
Check out the talented people who blog at Hep.

We provide information, support, referral and advocacy for people affected by viral hepatitis in NSW. We also provide workforce development and education services both to prevent the transmission of viral hepatitis and to improve services for those affected by it.
Latest blog entry: Pharmacists key in harm reduction

Life Beyond Hepatitis C
Life Beyond Hep C is where faith, medical resources and patient support meet, helping Hep C patients and their families navigate through the entire journey of Hep C.
Latest blog entry: Relief from Itching with Hepatitis C and Cirrhosis

Canadian Liver Foundation 
We strive to improve prevention and the quality of life of those living with liver disease by advocating for better screening, access to treatment, and patient care.
Latest blog entry: Who Gives a Sliver of a Liver to a Stranger?

Hepatitis B Foundation 
The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide.
Latest blog entry: - Be Your Own Advocate in the Medical Room
The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be transmitted two ways: 1) through direct contact with blood and 2) infected body fluids. Some risks for direct blood contact are obvious, such as touching an open wound to another open wound or cleaning up someone’s blood without any protective gear. However, other methods of blood transmission are harder to catch. Common activities like sharing razors, earrings, or toothbrushes are simple, innocent actions, yet they all have the potential for blood exchange.

HepatitisC.net
At HepatitisC.net we empower patients and caregivers to take control of Hepatitis C by providing a platform to learn, educate, and connect with peers and healthcare professionals.
Latest blog entry: Ask the Advocate: What Were Your First Symptoms of Hep C?
There are several common symptoms of chronic HCV, including fatigue, joint pain, muscle aches, low-grade fever, decreased appetite..

HIV and ID Observations 
An ongoing dialogue on HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, all matters medical, and some not so medical.
Latest blog entry: Doravirine Sets a New Standard for NNRTIs — But What Role in HIV Treatment Today?

KevinMD
Kevin Pho is a practicing physician and most known for his blog KevinMD. Thousands of authors contribute to his blog: primary care doctors, surgeons, specialist physicians, nurses, medical students, policy experts. And of course, patients, who need the medical profession to hear their voices.
One of the aspects of depression that’s particularly difficult is the sleep disturbance which accompanies it and often continues after the traditional symptoms of depression have finally gotten better.

On The Radio
Presented by Dr Norman Swan
Genetic test predicts dementia risk. Warning over new genetic tests on Medicare Benefits Schedule. Colonoscopy standards to reduce unnecessary treatment, risk of complications. Scan your heart to save your life...

Healthy You
This type of observational study is useful for comparing what happens to groups of people in different situations (in this case, people over 75 who have or haven't been prescribed statins), but it can't show cause and effect. So in this case, it can't show whether living longer or having strokes or heart attacks are a direct effect of taking or not taking statins...

Osteoporosis is often called "soft bones." "Osteoporosis is thinning of the bone to the point where the bones can break," says Dr. Bart Clarke, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist. https://youtu.be/fLS1tDriG3k Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (1:00) is in the downloads. Read the script. Dr. Clark says common breaks from thinning bones occur in the spine, wrist, shoulder and hip. "Women, in general, past menopause — past the mid-50s — are at high risk for this because of the…

Thanks for stopping by!
Tina

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Blog Updates: Pill testing as harm reduction, Vitamin B12 and Your Liver & International Liver Congress

International Liver Congress 2018 
The meeting will begin tomorrow! On Wednesday the "EASL Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2018" will be released.

Just Updated April 11 - EASL Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2018
Read the latest EASL clinical guideline publications in Journal of Hepatology, start by viewing EASL Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2018 shared by @HenryEChang via Twitter, review all guideline links, here.....

Of Interest
Download The App - EASL HCV Advisor
The HCV Advisor is available in two editions. The EASL HCV Advisor will give recommendations based on EASL Recommendations for Treatment of Hepatitis C. The Swiss HCV Advisor will give recommendations specifically for Switzerland. Learn more here.....

Updated Today
Check out news from the conference with a list of websites (still in the process of being updated) offering coverage, meeting highlights, learning activities, with interviews and a summary of the meeting. This page will stay current as information is made available, watch the sidebar for updates.

New Online
MedPage Today
April 10, 2018
Clinical practice guidelines to include HCV tx recommendations, alcoholic liver disease

Hepatitis C: What Stands in the Way of Elimination?
The World Health Organization set a goal of eliminating viral hepatitis by 2030. What are the barriers to achieving this for hepatitis C? Four experts weigh in.

Yun Lu, Xiuze Jin, Cheng-a-xin Duan, Feng Chang
DCV+ASV is not only an effective and well-tolerated regimen to treat chronic HCV genotype 1b infection treatment-naïve patients, but also is more cost-effective than PR regimen. DCV+ASV can benefit both the public health and reimbursement system in China.

On Twitter From @HenryEChang 
What are the research gaps when evaluating progress towards viral hepatitis elimination?
In this @jiasociety commentary, Drs. Anders Boyd, Léa Duchesne & @karlacombe highlight some recent advances & offer important perspectives.

In The Media
Hepatitis C: A novel point-of-care assay
April 10, 2018
One of the major challenges identified by the WHO in efforts to eradicate the hepatitis C virus is the diagnosis of chronic cases that are generally asymptomatic. Major progress is required for new diagnostic techniques that can be 'decentralized,' in other words accessed by populations and countries with limited resources. Scientists have now developed and validated a rapid, reliable, point-of-care HCV assay.

In Your 60s: Blood Pressure, Hepatitis C, Cancer Risk
April 10, 2018
In your 60s you are likely to have a long, healthy life ahead of you. Men turning 65 this year can expect to live, on average, to age 84.3; women, until age 86.6.

End-of-Treatment HBsAg Levels May Predict HBV Relapse in Chronic Hepatitis B
April 10, 2018
End-of-treatment HBsAg levels may be a clinically useful biomarker to predict HBV relapse in patients with chronic hepatitis B regardless of HBeAg status.

BMC Blog Network
Pill testing as harm reduction – a return to pragmatism in Australian drug policy
April 10, 2018
Pill testing involves party and festival-goers having a sample of their drugs tested on-site by scientists, who can then provide information to the user about what they are taking so they can make a more informed decision.

Pacific Hepatitis C Network (PHCN)
Hep C Resources in BC Project - Read the report "here."
The team at PHCN is happy to report that our Hep C in BC Resources project has recently drawn to a close. This project ran from last fall to the end of March. We are excited to share the full report of this project (as well as a summary version) "here."

CATIE
Treatment Update
CATIE’s flagship digest on cutting-edge developments in HIV and hepatitis C research and treatment.

HepCBC
Read today's news or a nice summary of notable headlines published in the latest issue of The Weekly Bull.

Treatment Action Group
TAGline Spring 2018
NEWS ON THE FIGHT TO END HIV/AIDS, VIRAL HEPATITIS, AND TUBERCULOSIS

Healio

World Hepatitis Alliance

Blog Updates
HEP Blogs
April 9, 2018
The high cost of hepatitis C treatment and lack of access to affordable health care are major obstacles to large scale and evenly distributed treatment. A recent study found that almost half of Medicaid patients were refused hepatitis C treatment. Moreover, there is a major inadequacy when it comes to screening people for viral hepatitis.

April 4, 2018
When you’ve been diagnosed with Hepatitis C or another liver condition it’s hard not to worry. Our thoughts naturally drift to thousands of questions and what ifs. Can you relate?

HEPATITISC.NET
April 5, 2018
I wish someone really knew the truth about how vitamins affected our liver. Do you ever just want an honest truthful answer? I’ve researched a lot, and can say, that for myself..

April 9, 2018
Many with hepatitis C, including many who have been cured, live with chronic pain and seek out ways to manage it. While doctors may prescribe pain medications, not everyone wants to take

How Did You Contract It?
April 9, 2018
Answering the most asked question given to those diagnosed with hep C: “How did you contract it?” The uncomfortable qustion This has got to be the most uncomfortable question anyone fighting hepatitis..

Going Through Rough Relationships After Diagnosis
March 30, 2018
Many with hepatitis C experience rough relationships after diagnosis. For myself, I went through a horrible divorce that really left me feeling alone, afraid, unattractive, and frankly sick. (All while in the middle of fighting for my life.) It was not that I blame hep C for this relationship ending but it contributed greatly to the dismay.

I Help C
April 4, 2018
I could look you straight in the eye, and yet not be aware of what I was doing. The world inside my head that didn’t always follow reality. Getting drunk produces the same results, but I wasn’t drunk. So does mental illness, but I wasn’t mentally ill. I had hepatic encephalopathy, or HE. Let’s talk about hepatic encephalopathy causes treatments symptoms.

Creating a World Free of Hepatitis C
Donate Life: Organ Donation and Transplantation
on April 5, 2018
It’s National Donate Life Month, and a time to increase awareness about organ and tissue donation. I am using this opportunity to implore readers to be organ donors.

Approximately 5-10% of people do not develop protective antibodies following the completion of the hepatitis B vaccine series. This is confirmed with a blood test called an anti-HBs titer test which is given 4 weeks following the completion of the series. If the test shows the titer is less then 10 mIU/mL the general recommendation is to complete the series again using a different brand of vaccine (e.g. if you received Engerix B, the first time, switch to Recombivax the 2nd time or vice-versa). A person is considered to be a “non-responder” if they have completed 2 full vaccination series’ without producing adequate protective antibodies.

On Twitter
It's time to get ready for Viral Hepatitis Awareness Month in May! Check out all the resources that @cdchep has to celebrate! http://ow.ly/Ms3130joKHt

CDC Hepatitis - Save The Date: Mon, Apr 16, 2018 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM EDT
Preparing for Hepatitis Awareness Month? Join us 4/16 at 2pm for a webinar with @NASTAD and @HepBUnited to learn about available resources and get event ideas!
Register here: http://bit.ly/2G81Iwh

Harm Reduction Coalition

Amplifying Hope
Interviewing the Unsung Champions of Harm Reduction
Over the next few months we will be interviewing a number of influential harm reduction and drug policy reform advocates from across the country. These are the people who are working against incredible odds, are largely unrecognized and serve as inspiration to the wider harm reduction community. Our aim is to amplify hope by telling their stories, uplift the people and programs delivering harm reduction services, and raise awareness about the strength and resilience of the harm reduction community across the U.S.

HIV and ID Observations
Latest DHHS Guidelines for Initial HIV Therapy Now Include 5 Choices — But Really 2 Are Best
April 8, 2018
On March 28, the Department of Health and Human Services Guidelines issued an update to the HIV treatment guidelines, with a focus on the recent approval of bictegravir/TAF/FTC...

Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation
Lifestyle Mindfulness for Your Liver
April 3, 2018
Healthy lifestyle remains the best defense against non-alcoholic liver disease
Do you know that you or a loved one may suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)? You may not have heard of such disease — but NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the United States, slowly making its way as the next global epidemic.

Harvard Health Blog
A study comparing a low-fat diet and a low-carb diet found that weight loss for both groups were quite similar, and both led to significant health improvements for the participants. Diet for weight loss was part of a broader strategy of lifestyle change for both groups as well.

In Case You Missed It 

Health News Review
April 10, 2018

FiercePharma
Physician payments linked to scripts for cancer drugs from Novartis, Pfizer and more: study
April 10, 2018
Many lawmakers worry that when pharma companies pay physicians—for speaking engagements, say, or hotel rooms at conferences—those on the receiving end are more likely to prescribe products from drugmakers that dole out the money. That concern even sparked a provision in the Affordable Care Act that requires drug and device companies to disclose any physician payment greater than $10.

Nature
A checkup for the flu vaccine
April 10, 2018
Influenza causes almost 650,000 deaths worldwide each year, yet a long-lasting, protective vaccine remains elusive. Global investment—both scientific and financial—in a universal flu vaccine is overdue. In this month's editorial, we call for a sustained commitment and global investments towards a universal flu vaccine.

Medscape
Single Quadrivalent Flu Shot in IBD Patients
Reuters Health Information April 9, 2018

Informational Links
Hepatitis C (HCV) Medications Blog
HCV Advocate’s Hepatitis C (HCV) Medications blog.
The intent of this blog is to keep our website audience up-to-date on information about hepatitis meds. People are encouraged to submit questions and post comments.

Until next time,
Tina

Sunday, February 25, 2018

All About The Flu & A Closer Look At Tamiflu

Thanks for stopping by, listen to Dr. William Schaffner answer your questions about the flu over at NPR's morning show, followed with news and research about this year's severe flu season.

NPR
February 25, 2018
The Call-In: All About The Flu
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro poses listener questions about the flu to Dr. William Schaffner, infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University, and takes a closer look at Tamiflu.


News, Research & You 

Hep
Living Healthy with Hepatitis C
Over-the-Counter Remedies and Hepatitis C
Excessive acetaminophen (Tylenol) is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the U.S. Because of this, many people avoid taking acetaminophen, sometimes following their doctor’s recommendations. The big problem with acetaminophen is that it is added to many medications, including remedies for colds, headaches, pain, sleep, sinus problems, cough and menstrual discomfort. People may not know that they are taking acetaminophen, let alone too much of it.

HealthDay 
Feb.23.2018
For the second week in a row, there was a drop in doctor visits for flu-like illness in the United States. And the latest drop was more pronounced than the one before, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.

CDC
Latest FluView report: flu activity has declined, but remains high and will likely continue for several more weeks. All U.S. states but Hawaii and Oregon continue to report widespread flu activity.

Studies have shown that early treatment with a flu antiviral drug can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, and can reduce the risk of serious flu complications.

NPR
February 20, 2018
Madeline K. Sofia, Meredith Rizzo

Forbes
Japan's New Drug: One Pill May Stop The Flu in Just One Day
Bruce Y. Lee
One day, you may be able to stop flu viruses in your body in just one day with just one pill. Based on an announcement yesterday, that day may be someday very soon in May in Japan.

Press Release
Flu vaccines: ACIP brings back FluMist for the 2018-2019 flu season
February 22, 2018
AstraZeneca announced yesterday that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has voted in favor of a renewed recommendation for the use of FLUMIST® QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine Live, Intranasal) in the US for the 2018-2019 season.

Science Daily 
Immune history influences vaccine effectiveness, interacting with other potential problems arising from the manufacturing process
Date: February 20, 2018
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center Summary: Researchers show that poor immune responses, not egg adaptions, may explain the low effectiveness of the vaccine that year.

Date: February 15, 2018
Source: Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago Summary: With this year’s severe flu season, one statistic is especially chilling. Each year, around 50 percent of all children under 5 years old who die from the flu were previously healthy. Adults who die from the flu, on the other hand, typically had a medical condition that increased their risk of mortality. A new study offers new insights as to why healthy children are much more vulnerable. It also opens new opportunities for treatment.

ContagionLive
CDC Reports That Flu Vaccine Has Been 36% Effective This Season
While a new report has found that the flu vaccine has been just 36% effective this year, a recent study suggests that history of exposure to flu may, in part, be to blame.

FEB 14, 2018 | EINAV KEET
Influenza A (H3N2) has caused most of the illnesses in this severe flu season, but influenza B is becoming increasingly responsible for more infections as the flu season continues to hit the United States.

The Atlantic
Sarah Zhang
Jan 13, 2018
A strong virus, a less-than-effective vaccine, and an IV bag shortage that goes back to Hurricane Maria.

In The Journals
Published in the January 2018 issue of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses
Estimates of influenza disease burden are broadly useful for public health, helping national and local authorities monitor epidemiologic trends, plan and allocate resources, and promote influenza vaccination. Historically, estimates of the burden of seasonal influenza in the United States, focused mainly on influenza-related mortality and hospitalization, were generated every few years.

Stay Healthy!
Tina

Monday, February 12, 2018

Shingles Vaccine Video, New Name for C. diff, Flu B Rising, and More — A Pre-Valentines Day ID Link-o-Rama


HIV and ID Observations

An ongoing dialogue on HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, all matters medical, and some not so medical.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Highlights
The ACIP issued its official recommendations for herpes zoster (shingles) immunization.
Preferred: the new recombinant zoster vaccine, abbreviated RZV, for people 50 and older. They do not recommend it (yet) for immunocompromised individuals — stay tuned. Does the recommendation include our stable, on-therapy HIV patients, who in increasing numbers are over 50? I say yes.

In this terrible flu season, should we be choosing one type of flu vaccine over another?
In the absence of head-to-head trials, it’s difficult to make an official endorsement. But as this interesting piece notes, there are differences between the available vaccines, differences that may lead to different rates of protection. Credit to Helen Branswell, a local journalist who has done superb reporting on the flu this year.

FDA approves bictegravir/FTC/TAF for initial and switch HIV therapy.
Now come two inevitable questions: 1) When will my patient’s insurance/ADAP/etc. cover it? 2) Who came up with that brand name? Biktarvy, jeepers.

Elsulfavirine, an investigational NNRTI, is also approved for HIV therapy.
OK, ok, so it’s approved in Russia, not here. Here’s a clinical trial comparing it to efavirenz from last year’s CROI.

Friday, February 2, 2018

February 2018 Hepatitis Updates: Opioid Addiction, Newsletters & Can HCV Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer

February 2018 Hepatitis Updates
Greetings, here is a recap of today's news, along with this months index of wonderful newsletters, publications, and blog updates; offering us invaluable information on the topic of viral hepatitis.

News Updates
MD Magazine
HCV Can Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation to occur in approximately 1 out of 5 patients treated for non-hepatic cancer, posing renewed risk for hepatic injury and possibly complicating the cancer treatment....

Here is the study, published last month in Hepatology “Hepatitis C virus reactivation in patients receiving cancer treatment: A prospective observational study

FEBRUARY 02, 2018
Kenneth Bender, PharmD, MA
A growing number of children are being hospitalized with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, coinciding with the increase in substance abuse in the US and the disproportionately greater rates in the northeast and southern regions.

Reuters Health
Hep B reactivation common during direct-acting antiviral therapy for hep C
Last Updated: 2018-02-02
By Will Boggs MD
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is common in patients with chronic HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection receiving direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.

"It is important to identify patients at risk of HBV reactivation," said Dr. Johannes Vermehren from University Hospital Frankfurt, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

"HBsAg-positive patients who also have detectable HBV DNA should be closely monitored when treated for hepatitis C with direct antivirals. Alternatively, (nucleoside/nucleotide) prophylaxis may be justified in these patients," he told Reuters Health by email.

HepCBC
Read today's news or a nice summary of notable headlines published in the latest issue of The Weekly Bull.

Medscape
COMMENTARY
William F. Balistreri
February 01, 2018
Although several studies have examined the frequency of various causes of abnormal liver test results in the general population and the role of liver biopsy in diagnosis, to date no controlled trials have been performed to determine the optimal approach to evaluating patients.

Healio
8 recent reports on prevention, prediction of cirrhosis
February 2, 2018
Chronic liver damage known as cirrhosis has a variety of causes. What remains constant is its potential progression to liver failure. Researchers continue to seek…
View all headlines @ Healio

Healio - In the Journals
SVR for HCV with no advanced liver disease greatly reduces mortality risk
Backus LI, et al. Hepatol. 2017;doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2017.07.032.
January 30, 2018
Patients with hepatitis C without advanced liver disease who achieved sustained virologic response with direct-acting antiviral therapy had significantly reduced all-cause mortality rates compared with both treated patients who did not achieve SVR and untreated patients, according to a recently published data.

World Hepatitis Alliance
Over the past two decades, deaths caused by liver cancer have increased by 80% , making it one of the fastest-growing causes of cancer deaths worldwide. According to the Global Burden of Disease Study, the most comprehensive worldwide observational epidemiological study to date, 830,000 people died as a result of the disease in 2016 compared to 464,000 people in 1990. This makes liver cancer the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, after lung cancer.

How to Find a Cancer Doctor
Feb 4, 2018
Cancer changes your life and the lives of those around you. Finding the right cancer doctor (called an oncologist) and treatment facility is an important step to getting the treatment and support you need.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) is the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization
World Cancer Day is 4 February.
Cancer kills 8.8 million people every year, and it's on the rise. Learn more about the European Code Against Cancer and 12 ways to reduce your cancer risk.

GI & Hepatology News
Baby boomers are the hepatitis C generation
Richard Franki Frontline Medical News
Publish date: February 2, 2018
Adults born before and after the boomers have much lower rates of hepatitis C–related hospitalizations.

infohep news
Harm reduction scale-up needed to eliminate HCV in people who inject drugs, European model predicts
Keith Alcorn / 01 February 2018
Elimination of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in Europe will require simultaneous scale-up of direct-acting antiviral treatment, needle and syringe programmes (NSP) and opioid substitution treatment (OST)

NPR
Understanding The Struggle Against Opioid Addiction
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Medicaid's former Chief Medical Officer Andrey Ostrovsky about his uncle's fatal drug overdose and his efforts to destigmatize opioid addiction.



Publications
NAM Publications
A new edition of our booklet HIV stigma & discrimination' is now available online. The booklet explains what stigma and discrimination are, makes some suggestions for how to deal with these problems and gives information about your legal rights. 
The purpose of this Training Manual is to provide information for you and your community. This information can be used to advocate for access to prevention and diagnosis of, and care and treatment for, hepatitis C virus (HCV).

The manual is written by and for people who are not medical specialists. We're treatment activists who learned about HCV because it was a problem for people in our communities.

The primary goals of the Training Manual are to increase advocates’ knowledge about available HCV tests and treatments, particularly in the era of all-oral, highly effective direct-acting antiviral medications that treat all genotypes, and to jumpstart discussions on advocacy strategies that can be used to open up affordable access for more people with HCV.

We designed it to help you understand basic information about HCV and coinfection with HIV: how it's transmitted, how to prevent HCV, how people can find out if they have HCV, what happens to both HIV-negative and HIV-positive people who have HCV, testing and treatment options, drug-drug interactions, and other information used for making treatment decisions.

This Training Manual is organized into short sections, and each section can be presented and shared by a trainer or peer educator with a small group of people in one to two hours. There are discussion points and action steps at the end of each section. The discussion points are intended to start conversations about the key issues raised in each section. The action steps are intended to start conversations about how to translate the key issues into advocacy in the community and to allow participants to find solutions together.

In Case You Missed It - Journal Updates
Original Article: Glecaprevir–Pibrentasvir for 8 or 12 Weeks in HCV Genotype 1 or 3 Infection
Full Text Article: Shared and downloaded via Twitter by Henry E. Chang 
View all Journal updates on this blog, here.....

Newsletters
HCV Advocate
February Newsletter
Highlights
Hepatitis A (HAV) Overview
HealthWise – Love, Sex, and Hepatitis C
Alcohol

Recommended reading at HCV Advocate
A Guide to Understanding and Managing Fatigue – learn about how fatigue can affect the body and mind and how to manage it.
A Guide for Employers and Coworkers – Living with hepatitis C is not easy. This fact sheet is designed to help you to educate employers and co-workers, but it’s a tricky business at the very least. But disclosure could prove to be helpful for the person living with HCV.
Meditation – most of us live stressful lives. Living with HCV can be even very stressful. This fact sheet offers helpful tips on various meditation techniques.
Sleep – Everyone needs it and it is an important component of living well with hepatitis C.

National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable
NVHR Newsletter

Save The Date - February 6, 2018
National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable NVHR
Engaging Active Drug Users About Hep C: From Testing Through Cure and Beyond
Tuesday, February 6, 2018, 12 pm Pacific/3 pm Eastern
Click here to register

Are drug users informing your agency’s programs and policies?
Do you know how to engage drug users?
What can be done to address concerns about adherence to hepatitis C treatment by people who use drugs?

We’ll discuss these questions and more during a webinar on February 6, 2018. The webinar will be hosted by the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, the Urban Survivor’s Union, the People’s Harm Reduction Alliance, and the Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition. These groups are working collaboratively on the “More than Tested, Cured” project which addresses barriers to hepatitis C care faced by individuals who use drugs. The webinar will also include findings from interviews with participants and healthcare providers and suggested messaging to improve access to hepatitis C care. After the presentation, there will be time for questions and discussion.

The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force
Hep Free NYC Newsletters

British Liver Trust

Blog Updates
HEPATITISC.NET
By Editorial Team - February 1, 2018
How do you tell your friends and family or romantic partners you’ve been diagnosed with hepatitis C? Just the stigma of hepatitis C alone can make relationships challenging enough. Add in symptoms...

By Kimberly Morgan Bossley - February 1, 2018
Ever go to your appointment and feel like your doctor is speaking a different language? Many times, going in to see my liver doctor I would be sitting there waiting with a list...

By Daryl Luster - January 30, 2018
Lost to care is a phrase that is not commonly mentioned in the community or really anywhere else very much. What does it mean? In the context of hep C, it relates...

HEP Blog
January 31, 2018
By Connie M. Welch
The preparation phase for treatment is very important. Knowledge is powerful. When patients prepare they are more likely to be proactive and handle treatment much easier.

By Lucinda K. Porter, RN
If your hepatitis was cured, but a new doctor tells you that you have hep C, should you panic? A look at what may be going on.

By Lucinda K. Porter, RN
Hepatitis C reactivation may occur in people receiving cancer treatment. However, hep C reactivation may not mean what you think it does.

By Karen Hoyt
A glimpse at an easily overlooked tool for healing.

The Hepatitis B Foundation
Herbal Remedies and Supplements
Herbal remedies are not regulated or tested for efficacy, safety or purity. At best they are supportive, but sometimes they cause more harm than good.

Harvard Health Blog
Posted February 02, 2018, 6:30 am
Are we headed toward a historically bad flu season? It’s too early to tell. This year, it could just be that flu season, which is usually at its worst in February, is peaking early. Hospitals across the United States have been flooded with flu patients. Matters have been made worse by national shortages of IV fluids in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

FDA Statement - Impact of saline shortages during this flu season
February 02, 2018
Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, on ongoing efforts to mitigate impact of saline shortages during this flu season
This year’s flu season has been particularly challenging, with a notable number of cases leading to hospitalization. The season started earlier than usual and seemed to spread across many states quickly. H3N2, the predominant strain of the influenza A virus this season, has led to health complications that are more severe than those seen during an H1N1-predominant season. We recognize that managing the thousands of flu-related hospitalizations has increased the demand for certain saline products – which are commonly used to both hydrate and deliver medications via intravenous routes. As we’ve shared over the past several months, across the country, there remains a shortage of IV saline bags, which have long faced supply issues. These supply issues were worsened by the impact of Hurricane Maria on the medical products manufacturing sector in Puerto Rico, which impacted small volume IV bags. Although the saline shortage is improving, this year’s worse-than-normal flu season and workarounds deployed by health care providers in the wake of this shortage have increased demand for saline and other products.

This flu season's hospitalizations are highest in nearly a decade
by Lena H. Sun February 2 at 2:17 PM
This year's flu season has now sent more people to the hospital with the illness than in nearly a decade, federal health officials said Friday. Nationwide during the past week, 16 more children died from the virus.

So far this season, influenza has caused the deaths of at least 53 children, rivaling that of the especially severe 2014-2015 flu season. Eighty percent of them had not had a flu shot....

Enjoy the upcoming weekend!
Tina

Photo Credit: Bygone Boys