Showing posts with label 2017 World Hepatitis Day. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 2017 World Hepatitis Day. Show all posts

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Hepatitis C: analysis of cures versus new infections in 91 countries

Review
The road to elimination of hepatitis C: analysis of cures versus new infections in 91 countries
Andrew M Hill, Sanjay Nath, Bryony Simmons 

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Published July, 2017

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Abstract
Background
Hepatitis C (HCV) can only be eradicated if annual rates of cure (SVR) are consistently and significantly higher than new HCV infections, across many countries. In 2016, the WHO called for a 90% reduction in new HCV infection by 2030. Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) can cure the majority of those treated, at around 90% in most populations, at potentially very low prices. We compared the net annual change in epidemic size across 91 countries using data on SVR, new HCV infections, and deaths. In a further 109 countries, we projected this figure using regional averages of epidemic size.

Methods
Epidemiological data for 2016 were extracted from national reports, publications and the Polaris Observatory. There were 91/210 countries with data on SVR, HCV-related deaths and new infections available for analysis; 109 countries had net change in epidemic size projected from the regional prevalence of HCV, extrapolated to their population size. ‘Net cure’ was defined as the number of people with SVR, minus new HCV infections, plus HCV-related deaths in 2016.

Results
For the 91 countries analysed, there were 57.3 million people with chronic HCV infection in 2016. In the remaining 109 countries, the projected epidemic size was 12.2 million, giving a global epidemic size of 69.6 million. Across the 91 countries, there was a fall from 57.3 to 56.9 million people in 2017, a 0.7% reduction. The projected global net change was from 69.6 to 69.3 million, a 0.4% reduction. Ten countries had at least five times more people reaching SVR than new HCV infections, including Egypt and USA. In 47/91 countries, there were more HCV infections than SVR in 2016.

Conclusion
Very few countries are on target to achieve elimination of HCV as a public health problem by 2030. While the North American, North African/Middle East and Western European regions have shown small declines in prevalence, the epidemic is growing in sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern Europe. Far higher rates of DAA treatment are required for worldwide elimination of HCV.


Friday, July 28, 2017

We can cure hepatitis C. But we’re now making the same mistake we did with AIDS

The Washington Post

We can cure hepatitis C. But we’re now making the same mistake we did with AIDS

 
Three years ago, we wrote about the wide gap in access to hepatitis C treatment, hoping that mistakes made in the world’s response to AIDS would not be repeated in another epidemic of a lethal, blood-borne disease.
Our worst fears have been realized. The World Health Organization now reports that 4 out of 5 people infected with hepatitis C aren’t even aware of it. Of those who do know, fewer than 1 in 50 have received treatment. These numbers are far worse in parts of South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the global extreme poor live. In many places, such as Rwanda, infected patients remain on waiting lists for treatment, without which many succumb early to liver failure, cancer and other related complications.
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Nature - Eliminating viral hepatitis, articles and interviews

Nature - Eliminating viral hepatitis, articles and interviews

Article series: Eliminating viral hepatitis
Viral hepatitis is a global public health problem, and the burden of disease is increasing. In 2016, spurred by development of effective new treatments for hepatitis C and expanding access to hepatitis B vaccination, the 194 Member States of the WHO committed to eliminating viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030. Here, Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology explores areas vital to meeting this ambitious target, from basic viral research to public policy.

2017
August 2017 Volume 14 Number 8
Eliminating viral hepatitis — momentum must keep building
doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2017.107
Abstract
Full text
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August 2017 Volume 14 Number 8
Many European countries 'flying blind' in their efforts to eliminate viral hepatitis
doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2017.98
Abstract
Full text
PDF (255 KB)

August 2017 Volume 14 Number 8
HCV elimination — lessons learned from a small Eurasian country, Georgia
doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2017.100
Abstract
Full text
PDF (179 KB)

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For World Hepatitis Day Nature Releases Viral Hepatitis Articles and Interviews

Hugh Thomas writes an introduction to World Hepatitis Day 2017, including a mini-collection of research on viral hepatitis, in addition read an array of interviews about viral hepatitis research.

Raquel Peck CEO of the World Hepatitis Alliance explains the importance of World Hepatitis Day , Jeffrey V Lazarus and Kelly Safreed-Harmon discuss  WHO's strategy towards the elimination of viral hepatitis.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

"Speak Up" on World Hepatitis Day - The Hepatitis C Trust Patient Conference programme announced

The Hepatitis C Trust Patient Conference programme announced



The Hepatitis C Trust is delighted to confirm the programme for this year's Patient Conference, which is being held in London on 28th July to coincide with World Hepatitis Day. Speakers will include Professor Graham Foster (Professor of Hepatology, Queen Mary University), Sam May (Head of Support Services, The Hepatitis C Trust), and Dr Magdalena Harris (Lecturer, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), and there will also be an opportunity to share personal stories about the impact of hepatitis C.

The event is free to attend for all patients and professionals and you can secure your place here.

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