Showing posts with label HCV Awareness-screening strategies. Show all posts
Showing posts with label HCV Awareness-screening strategies. Show all posts

Thursday, June 21, 2018

60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis, nearly 75% percent don't know it


7 in 10 people with liver disease in the UK don’t even know they have it 
Although over 60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, nearly 75% percent don't know it, according to research published in the Lancet. For many, the first indication is following admission to Accident and Emergency when the disease is advanced and chance of survival is very low. This week, 18th to 24th June, is Love Your Liver week, and the British Liver Trust has launched a new version of an online screening tool so that people can find out if they are at risk.

Although over 60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, nearly 75% percent don't know it, according to research published in the Lancet. For many, the first indication is following admission to Accident and Emergency when the disease is advanced and chance of survival is very low. This week, 18th to 24th June, is Love Your Liver week, and the British Liver Trust has launched a new version of an online screening tool so that people can find out if they are at risk.

Liver disease is one of the leading causes of premature death in England and is responsible for more than 1 in 10 deaths of people in their 40s.

Professor Nick Sheron, a liver expert from the University of Southampton involved in the research, said: "Liver disease develops silently with no signs or symptoms and is the second leading cause of years or working life lost. If current trends continue it become the leading cause of premature mortality in the UK. Yet, most people with fatal advanced liver disease only become aware that they have a liver problem when they are admitted as an emergency. We MUST diagnose these people much earlier."

Liver problems develop silently with no obvious symptoms in the early stages yet the disease is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. The Love Your Liver awareness campaign, promoted by the British Liver Trust, aims to reach the one in five people in the UK who may have the early stages of liver disease, but are unaware of it.

More than 90% of liver disease is due to three main risk factors: obesity, alcohol and viral hepatitis.

Judi Rhys, Chief Executive, British Liver Trust said, “Helping people understand how to reduce their risk of liver damage is vital to address the increase in deaths from liver disease. Although the liver is remarkably resilient, if left too late damage is often irreversible. I would urge everyone to take our online screener on our website to see if they are at risk.”

The British Liver Trust’s Love Your Liver campaign focuses on three simple steps to Love Your Liver back to health:

- Drink within recommended limits and have three consecutive alcohol-free days every week
- Cut down on sugar, carbohydrates and fat and take more exercise
- Know the risk factors for viral hepatitis and get tested or vaccinated if at risk

Finding out your risk of liver disease only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Take the British Liver Trust’s screener here

Liver disease is one of the leading causes of premature death in England and is responsible for more than 1 in 10 deaths of people in their 40s.

Professor Nick Sheron, a liver expert from the University of Southampton involved in the research, said: "Liver disease develops silently with no signs or symptoms and is the second leading cause of years or working life lost. If current trends continue it become the leading cause of premature mortality in the UK. Yet, most people with fatal advanced liver disease only become aware that they have a liver problem when they are admitted as an emergency. We MUST diagnose these people much earlier."

Liver problems develop silently with no obvious symptoms in the early stages yet the disease is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. The Love Your Liver awareness campaign, promoted by the British Liver Trust, aims to reach the one in five people in the UK who may have the early stages of liver disease, but are unaware of it.

More than 90% of liver disease is due to three main risk factors: obesity, alcohol and viral hepatitis.

Judi Rhys, Chief Executive, British Liver Trust said, “Helping people understand how to reduce their risk of liver damage is vital to address the increase in deaths from liver disease. Although the liver is remarkably resilient, if left too late damage is often irreversible. I would urge everyone to take our online screener on our website to see if they are at risk.”

Finding out your risk of liver disease only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Take the British Liver Trust’s screener here

Monday, June 4, 2018

Updated Guidelines - Hepatitis C testing recommended for Canadians born between 1945 and 1975

Podcast
In this podcast, Dr. Hemant Shah and Dr. Jordan Feld discuss a clinical practice guideline from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver on the management of chronic hepatitis C. The guideline is published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).


CMAJ Vol. 190, Issue 22 4 Jun 2018
The management of chronic hepatitis C: 2018 guideline update from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver
Hemant Shah, Marc Bilodeau, Kelly W. Burak, Curtis Cooper, Marina Klein, Alnoor Ramji, Dan Smyth and Jordan J. Feld; for the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver
CMAJ June 04, 2018 190 (22) E677-E687; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.170453

A recent modelling study suggested that about 252 000 Canadians (uncertainty interval: 178 000–315 000 Canadians) were chronically infected in 2013. The birth cohort of 1945–1975 has the highest prevalence of chronic HCV infection, yet it is estimated that up to 70% of this group have not been tested for HCV 

KEY POINTS
Hepatitis C is a major public health problem in Canada that is underdiagnosed and undertreated; birth cohort screening would benefit population health outcomes.

Pretreatment evaluation of an infected patient should include clinical evaluation, viral load, genotype and a fibrosis stage assessment.

The treatment of hepatitis C has become safer, better tolerated and more effective owing to the availability of direct-acting antivirals for nearly all patients; this guideline advocates against the use of any interferon-based treatment regimens and for the use of all-oral regimens for all infected patients.

The treatment of infected patients should be individualized to maximize chance of success, especially for difficult-to-cure populations, including patients with renal failure, decompensated cirrhosis, and active substance use disorders.

After treatment, the follow-up of successfully treated patients depends on whether they are cirrhotic; patients with cirrhosis require life-long surveillance for the development of hepatocellular cancer.

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a highly burdensome public health problem in Canada, causing more years of life lost than any other infectious disease in the country. 13 A recent modelling study suggested that about 252 000 Canadians (uncertainty interval: 178 000–315 000 Canadians) were chronically infected in 2013. The birth cohort of 1945–1975 has the highest prevalence of chronic HCV infection, yet it is estimated that up to 70% of this group have not been tested for HCV.4

Although the overall prevalence of chronic hepatitis C is declining, complications of the disease are increasing because of aging of the infected population and progression of liver fibrosis.13 Modelling data suggest that if nothing is done to change the current situation, cases of decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver-related mortality will increase by 80%, 205% and 160%, respectively, by 2035 compared with 2013 levels.2

The primary objective of anti-HCV therapy is complete eradication of the virus, termed a sustained virologic response, which is defined as absence of viremia 12 weeks after completion of therapy. 5 Once achieved, sustained virologic response is considered a true cure of the viral infection, as late relapses are very uncommon. 6,7 Sustained virologic response is associated with long-term health benefits that include improved quality of life8,9 and liver histology, 10,11 and reduced incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma,12 liver-related morbidity and mortality,1315 and all-cause mortality.12

Since the last Canadian guideline on the management of chronic HCV infection from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver was published in 2015,16 there have been remarkable treatment advances. Thus, there was a need for an updated, evidence-based guideline.
Continue reading: http://www.cmaj.ca/content/190/22/E677

In The News
Hepatitis C testing recommended for Canadians born between 1945 and 1975
More than 250,000 Canadians are believed to be infected with hepatitis C, but 40 to 70 per cent are unaware they harbour the blood-borne virus. The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver, a national group of health-care providers and researchers, published its guidelines on testing and treating hepatitis C in Monday’s edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Continue reading: http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/hepatitis-c-testing-recommended-for-canadians-born-between-1945-and-1975

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Weekend Video: HCV From Screening to Cure - Hosted By Ira M. Jacobson, MD.

Good day folks, the following video presentation; "HCV From Screening to Cure: A Closer Look at Changing At-Risk Populations and an Evolving Treatment Landscape" with Ira M. Jacobson, MD., and provided by Medical Learning Institute, Inc. and PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education, is now available for your viewing pleasure.

In this learning activity the good doctor will discuss screening strategies, stigma, patient-related barriers to treatment, hepatitis C testing for identifying current infection, and tests used to stage fibrosis. Also discussed is treatment for HCV patients with cirrhosis, as well as treatment adherence, duration, treatment according to HCV genotype, ending with "How Much Care Do The Cured Need?"

Although the learning activity is aimed at HCV specialists, this short patient-friendly presentation is beneficial for anyone considering HCV testing and treatment.



PeerView CME
Published on May 25, 2018
Released April 30, 2018
Ira M. Jacobson, MD, discusses hepatitis C virus in this CME/CE activity titled "HCV From Screening to Cure: A Closer Look at Changing At-Risk Populations and an Evolving Treatment Landscape." For the full presentation and infographics, complete CME/CE information, and to apply for credit, please visit us at http://www.peerview.com/FNC865. CME/CE credit will be available until April 29, 2019.

This CME/CE activity is jointly provided by Medical Learning Institute, Inc. and PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Michael Kirsch, M.D. - Why I Now Treat Hepatitis C Patients

Michael Kirsch, MD, a full time practicing physician who blogs at “MD Whistleblower ,” in the past has written about the controversies surrounding hepatitis C; from weighing in on the value of HCV screening strategies, treatment risks and benefits, to the price of a cure. After reviewing his previous articles over the years its clear he did not recommend treating HCV patients, today he explains why he has changed his mind, he writes;
Patients come to my office already informed about current HCV treatment. Many are referred to me by physicians expecting me to treat them. The drugs are safe and effective and approved by the F.D.A. Although I still feel we are overtreating, my arguments for holding back have been somewhat dismantled by the new pharmaceutical developments. Am I now at the vanguard of the Medical Industrial Complex?
Check out previous articles, followed by his current take on treating HCV.

2012: 
2018:

April 15, 2018
Why I Now Treat Hepatitis C Patients
Michael Kirsch, M.D.
In a prior post, I shared my heretofore reluctance to prescribe medications to my Hepatitis C (HCV) patients. In summary, after consideration of the risks and benefits of the available options, I could not persuade myself – or my patients – to pull the trigger. These patients were made aware of my conservative philosophy of medical practice. I offered every one of them an opportunity to consult with another specialist who had a different view on the value of HCV treatment.

I do believe that there is a medical industrial complex that is flowing across the country like hot steaming lava. While I have evolved in many ways professionally over the years, I have remained steadfast that less medical care generally results in better outcomes.

Saturday, April 7, 2018

HCV Screening: Important for Rheumatology Patients

HCV Screening: Important for Rheumatology Patients
Cassandra Calabrese, DO, shares her experiences
by Cassandra Calabrese, DO
April 07, 2018
I spent this past week seeing hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients with our hepatologists. Being a rheumatologist, I was looking forward to seeing extrahepatic manifestations of HCV that we read about in textbooks -- cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, sicca syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda, and many others. I suppose I should not be surprised that the week passed without seeing a single one of these.

While a wide array of extrahepatic manifestations, including may rheumatologic ones, will occur in 40%-70% of chronic HCV patients, the advent of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) has changed HCV outcomes, such that I do not think we will be seeing these cases much longer...

Free registration may be required

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Other Conditions That May Be Related To HCV

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Strategies for the elimination of HCV infection as a public health threat in the United States

Strategies for the elimination of HCV infection as a public health threat in the United States
Charitha Gowda & Vincent Lo Re III

Full-text shared via Twitter by Henry E. Chang
View PDF
Charitha Gowda
1,2
&
Vincent Lo Re III
2,3,4

Abstract
Purpose of Review Direct-acting antiviral regimens for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection became available in 2014, and these highly curative therapies have the potential to reduce HCV-associated morbidity and mortality, decrease HCV transmission, and eliminate HCV infection as a public health problem. This review summarizes the recommendations by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine for a US strategy for HCV elimination.

Recent Findings
To achieve proposed targets of reducing HCV incidence by 90% and decreasing HCV-related mortality by 60% by 2030, there is a critical need to improve HCV diagnosis and linkage to care, reduce HCV-related disease by antiviral treatment scale-up, reduce HCV incidence, and strengthen HCV surveillance to determine achievement of HCV elimination targets over time.

Summary
While HCV elimination is feasible, success of this national effort will require ongoing collaboration and critical resource investment by key stakeholders, including medical and public health communities, legislators, community organizers, and patient advocates



View complete article:
https://jumpshare.com/v/poLU2Wzhg8COI6ACxY5D

Current Hepatology Reports
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11901-018-0394-x

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Hepatitis C in Injection-Drug Users — A Hidden Danger of the Opioid Epidemic

New England Journal of Medicine
Interview with Dr. Jake Liang on the increasing spread of hepatitis C virus associated with injection-drug use.

Perspective
Hepatitis C in Injection-Drug Users — A Hidden Danger of the Opioid Epidemic
T. Jake Liang, M.D.,
and John W. Ward, M.D.
Much has been written about the escalating crisis of opioid-overdose deaths in the United States and its mounting social and economic costs. Although political and public health leaders have begun to confront this urgent problem, hidden beneath it lies another danger: the increasing spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) associated with injection-opioid use
Related article

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Hepatitis C Virus Screening Rates Remain Low Among Baby Boomers

Hepatitis C virus screening rates remain low among baby boomers

Nearly half of all cases of US liver cancer are caused by HCV
American Association for Cancer Research

Bottom Line: Despite the steady increase of liver cancer incidence in the United States in recent decades, data from 2015 indicates that less than 13 percent of individuals born between 1945 and 1965 are estimated to have undergone screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Authors: Susan Vadaparampil, PhD, MPH, senior author, senior member and professor, Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; Monica Kasting, PhD, lead author, postdoctoral fellow, Division of Population Science, Moffitt Cancer Center; Anna Giuliano, PhD, founding director of the Center for Infection Research in Cancer, Moffitt Cancer Center.

Background: "In the United States, approximately one in 30 baby boomers are chronically infected with HCV," said Vadaparampil. "Almost half of all cases of liver cancer in the United States are caused by HCV. Therefore, it is important to identify and treat people who have the virus in order to prevent cancer."

"Hepatitis C is an interesting virus because people who develop a chronic infection remain asymptomatic for decades and don't know they're infected," explained Kasting. "Most of the baby boomers who screen positive for HCV infection were infected over 30 years ago, before the virus was identified."

Because over 75 percent of HCV-positive individuals were born between 1945 and 1965, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now recommend that baby boomers get screened for the virus. However, data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicated that only 12 percent of baby boomers had been screened for HCV, Kasting explained. The researchers wanted to study if HCV screening rates had increased following the FDA approval of several well-tolerated and effective treatments for HCV infection.

How the Study Was Conducted: Using NHIS data from 2013-2015, Kasting and colleagues analyzed HCV screening prevalence among four different age cohorts (born before 1945, born 1945-1965, born 1966-1985, and born after 1985). Participants were asked if they had ever had a blood test for hepatitis C. As the researchers were interested in assessing HCV screening in the general population, they excluded certain populations who were more likely to be screened for the virus, resulting in a total sample size of 85,210 participants.

Results: After multivariable analysis, Kasting and colleagues found that females were screened less often than males in every age cohort. Additionally, among baby boomers and those born between 1966-1985, HCV screening rates were lower among Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks. "This is concerning because these groups have higher rates of HCV infection and higher rates of advanced liver disease," noted Kasting. "This may reflect a potential health disparity in access to screening, and therefore treatment, for a highly curable infection."

Among baby boomers, HCV screening rates ranged from 11.9 percent in 2013 to 12.8 percent in 2015. Regardless of the federal screening recommendations, less than 20 percent of baby boomers reported that the reason for their screening was due to their age.

Author's Comments: "Our most important finding is that the HCV screening rate isn't increasing in a meaningful way," said Giuliano. "Between 2013 and 2015, HCV screening only increased by 0.9 percent in the baby boomer population. Given rising rates of liver cancer and high HCV infection rates in this population, this is a critically important finding. It shows that we have substantial room for improvement and we need additional efforts to get this population screened and treated as a strategy to reduce rising rates of liver cancer in the United States."

Study Limitations: Limitations of the study include a reliance on self-reported data. "Another limitation is that this is secondary data and we didn't collect it ourselves," noted Kasting. "There are several questions we would have liked to ask about behavioral risk factors, such as drug use, that weren't utilized on this survey."

Funding & Disclosures: This study was supported by the Biostatistics Core and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Kasting is supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

As a member of Merck Scientific Advisory Boards, Giuliano and her institution have received funds from Merck. An additional author on the study, David Nelson, MD, has received grant support from Abbvie, Gilead, and Merck. All other authors declare no conflicts of interest.

https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-03/aafc-hcv032318.php

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Audio Story- Hepatitis C Is More Common In Vietnam Vets, But Nobody Is Sure Why

From: American Homefront Project
PRX » Station » North Country Public Radio
By Sarah Harris • Mar 15, 2018
Produced: Mar 13, 2018
Sarah Harris reports on an effort to get Vietnam vets checked and treated for Hepatitis C.

Article: http://americanhomefront.wunc.org/post/hepatitis-c-more-common-vietnam-vets-nobody-sure-why

The reasons that Vietnam vets are more likely to have hepatitis C are disputed. Kaifetz blames a device called the "jet gun injector" that the military used to vaccinate service members during the Vietnam era. It generated a burst of air pressure to force the vaccine under the skin.

"It was supposed to shoot the injection through your skin cells without piercing the skin with a needle," Kaifetz explained.

Even though the gun wasn't supposed to break the skin, a lot of veterans say it made them bleed. The gun usually wasn't sterilized between each use.

Source:
This story was produced by the American Homefront Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Funding comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Bob Woodruff Foundation. 

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Hepatitis C: Key elements for successful European and national strategies to eliminate HCV in Europe

J Viral Hepat. 2018 Mar;25 Suppl 1:6-17. doi: 10.1111/jvh.12875.

Special Issue: Summit review: HCV Policy Summit Hepatitis C: The Beginning of the End - Key elements for successful European and national strategies to eliminate HCV in Europe

COMMISSIONED REVIEW
Hepatitis C: The beginning of the end—key elements for successful European and national strategies to eliminate HCV in Europe
Authors G. V. Papatheodoridis, A. Hatzakis, E. Cholongitas, R. Baptista-Leite, I. Baskozos, J. Chhatwal, M. Colombo, H. Cortez-Pinto, A. Craxi, D. Goldberg, C. Gore, A. Kautz, J. V. Lazarus, L. Mendão, M. Peck-Radosavljevic, H. Razavi, E. Schatz, N. Tözün, P. van Damme, H. Wedemeyer, Y. Yazdanpanah, F. Zuure, M. P. Manns

First published: 6 March 2018
Full publication history DOI: 10.1111/jvh.12875

Full Text
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jvh.12875/full

Abstract
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health problem in the European Union (EU). An estimated 5.6 million Europeans are chronically infected with a wide range of variation in prevalence across European Union countries. Although HCV continues to spread as a largely "silent pandemic," its elimination is made possible through the availability of the new antiviral drugs and the implementation of prevention practices. On 17 February 2016, the Hepatitis B & C Public Policy Association held the first EU HCV Policy Summit in Brussels. This summit was an historic event as it was the first high-level conference focusing on the elimination of HCV at the European Union level. The meeting brought together the main stakeholders in the field of HCV: clinicians, patient advocacy groups, representatives of key institutions and regional bodies from across European Union; it served as a platform for one of the most significant disease elimination campaigns in Europe and culminated in the presentation of the HCV Elimination Manifesto, calling for the elimination of HCV in Europe by 2030. The launch of the Elimination Manifesto provides a starting point for action in order to make HCV and its elimination in Europe an explicit public health priority, to ensure that patients, civil society groups and other relevant stakeholders will be directly involved in developing and implementing HCV elimination strategies, to pay particular attention to the links between hepatitis C and social marginalization and to introduce a European Hepatitis Awareness Week.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Hidden chronic hepatitis C infections remain hard to detect

Hidden chronic hepatitis C infections remain hard to detect
By Mark L. Fuerst
Strategies to detect HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) hidden in the general population have been disappointing. “Past drug users or recipients of blood transfusions remain hidden as they may not remember or report these behaviors. Additionally, not all HCV cases are part of a known risk group. To capture all persons who have HCV infection, prospective studies were needed to evaluate the diagnostic yield of HCV testing strategies not based on exposure risk factors,” Jeanne Heil, MSc, of the Public Health Service in Heerlen, The Netherlands, told Medical Economics.

The researchers published their results January 8, 2018 in Annals of Family Medicine.

Continue reading......

Recommended Reading
HCV Screening of the General Population Should Be Considered
Liver International, February 22, 2018

But many don't get treatment

Model used in VA healthcare system could be translated to other settings

Monday, February 12, 2018

Is global elimination of HCV realistic?

Liver International 
Is global elimination of HCV realistic?
Vincenza Calvaruso, Salvatore Petta, Craxì A
DOI: 10.1111/liv.13668

First published: 10 February 2018

Online:

Abstract
The elimination of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been made possible through the availability of new antiviral drugs which may now be administered to all patients with HCV infection, even those with decompensated cirrhosis. The goal of the World Health Organization (WHO) is to reduce the incidence of chronic hepatitis infection from the current 6-10 million to 0.9 million cases of chronic infections by 2030, and annual deaths from 1.4 million to fewer than 0.5 million. Achieving these targets will require full implementation of epidemiological knowledge of HCV infection, screening and testing practices and strategies to link HCV patients to care. This review will focus on the current state of knowledge in the epidemiology of HCV and what can be done to increase patient awareness and reduce the barriers to treatment. Furthermore, we will discuss the role of HCV clearance on the control of HCV-related outcomes

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Podcast - Referring, and Managing Patients with HCV

Consultant360.com

Published - January 26, 2018
Dr. Jorge Herrera, director of the Section of Hepatology and professor of Internal Medicine at the University of South Alabama, discusses screening, referring, and managing patients with hepatitis C virus.

Overview
Hepatitis C Risk Factors
Testing
Primary Care Physicians Treating HCV
Referral Process
Drug interactions
Define Cure
Treat Early
Quality of life after SVR
Treat All




Find more hepatitis-related content at our specialty site here.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Treating Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: A Call to Action for Primary Care Providers

Experts And Viewpoints, January 2018
Treating Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in Primary Care
New treatment guidelines aim to support primary care clinicians in the treatment of hepatitis C infection. 

COMMENTARY
Treating Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: A Call to Action for Primary Care Providers

Christine A. Kerr, MD; Josh S. Aron, MD
January 17, 2018

Despite a revolutionary opportunity to end the global HCV epidemic, there clearly is a need for a concerted effort to help many more people benefit from curative therapy. It is evident that we, as healthcare providers, must step up our efforts to reach and treat patients who can benefit from DAA therapy. Only 9% of the 4 million Americans living with HCV have been successfully treated.


Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Best Practice Testing Failed to ID Hidden HCV Infections

Medscape News
Best Practice Testing Failed to ID Hidden HCV Infections
Veronica Hackethal, MD
January 08, 2018

A best practices strategy to improve detection of hepatitis B (HBV) and HCV virus infections had high uptake but failed to find undiagnosed HCV infections, a study found.

The study, published online January 8 in the Annals of Family Medicine, is the first conducted in Europe to use a strategy that combines public health and primary care in birth cohort testing of hotspots with high HCV prevalence.

"Because no active HCV infections were found in the identified hotspots, it is likely that the strategy taken would not be effective in other areas of the Netherlands and other low-prevalence countries," Jeanne Heil, MSc, from the Public Health Service, South Limburg, Heerlen, the Netherlands, and colleagues write...

Friday, December 15, 2017

Community Health Clinics Evolving HCV Programs

AGA Reading Room 12.14.2017

Community Health Clinics Evolving HCV Programs
by Pippa Wysong
Increasing importance in treating high-risk populations
Community health clinics (CHCs) are taking on greater roles in terms of screening and treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients, but new models of care are just starting to evolve to improve access and care for the high-risk, complex populations they tend to serve...

Expert Critique
Michelle Long
With the wide availability of highly effective treatments for hepatitis C (HCV) the challenges in treating HCV now lies in improving access for high-risk populations. Federally funded community health clinics are now a prime access point for screening and treating HCV, particularly for the uninsured or under-insured. HCV is highly prevalent in the patient population served by community health clinics, which make them a good place to identify high-risk patients. However, the infrastructure for coordinating screening and delivering treatments needs development in many community health clinics. Additional training programs for primary care physicians and telemedicine programs would be helpful as well, since access to sub-specialty care is often limited. Few centers have adapted existing programs with success, but this has not yet been adapted on a large scale, and funding for such efforts is limited.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

HCV Prevention in Correctional Settings Is Good Medicine

Clinical Thought
HCV Prevention in Correctional Settings Is Good Medicine
Lara Strick MD, MS - 12/12/2017

Implementation of prevention services targeting incarcerated patients is possible. Let me tell you why. 
Although the United States lags far behind in public acceptance and implementation of harm reduction services like condoms, needle exchanges, and regulated tattooing in the correctional setting, it is important to note that other countries have successfully launched such programming. For now, we need to rely on risk reduction counseling to augment prevention ahead of full maturation of our harm reduction initiatives. For instance, medication assistance for drug addiction is steadily garnering more attention across the United States as the public profile of the opioid epidemic expands, increasing the political will to broaden efforts to correctional facilities. 
But perhaps the most important thing to remember is this: Implementation of prevention services targeting incarcerated patients is possible. Do not let the fact that you are serving a correctional population prevent you from practicing good medicine because, ultimately, prevention is good medicine.
Continue reading: Clinical Care Options  
Free registration required 

Related Discussions - Clinical Care Options

Video HCV Series from Medscape TV - Patient education and screening

Six Episode Series from Medscape TV - Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat
In the past few years, a new class of direct-acting antiviral agents has made the treatment of HCV easier and more effective than ever before, with cure rates nearing 100%, even among HIV-positive patients. But not all patients with HCV who are eligible for antiviral treatment are identified, and even fewer are being referred for care. Thus, HCV infection remains a significant risk for progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver specialists at two prestigious Chicago medical centers confront the key issues in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

Medscape TV Final Episode
December 11, 2017
EPISODE 6 - Strategies for Prevention
Primary care physicians can help stem the spread of HCV infection through patient education and screening

November 8, 2017 
EPISODE 5 - Hepatitis C Virus: Dealing With Chronic Disease
Patients with advanced disease will need help beyond current therapy, including managing comorbidities and navigating transplant.

October 10, 2017

EPISODE 4 - The New Regimens
Liver specialists find that HCV patients who have comorbid conditions and treatment-resistant disease may still be candidates for combination therapies.

August 17, 2017
EPISODE 3 - Hope and Uncertainty
Patients who have not responded to previous HCV therapies often need support to continue therapy and testing, and to maintain health.

July 17, 2017
EPISODE 2 - Considerations Before HCV Therapy
Physicians assess such factors as performance status and risk for reinfection to determine whether a patient is a candidate to receive HCV treatments.

June 21, 2017
EPISODE 1 - Strides and Obstacles
HCV treatments are highly efficacious, but challenges remain in screening persons at risk of contracting and spreading infection, as well as in the treatment of liver diseases caused by HCV

Friday, November 17, 2017

The HepTestContest: a global innovation contest to identify approaches to hepatitis B and C testing

BMC Infectious Diseases
The HepTestContest: a global innovation contest to identify approaches to hepatitis B and C testing
Joseph D. Tucker, Kathrine Meyers, John Best, Karyn Kaplan, Razia Pendse, Kevin A. Fenton, Isabelle Andrieux-Meyer, Carmen Figueroa, Pedro Goicochea, Charles Gore, Azumi Ishizaki, Giten Khwairakpam, Veronica Miller, Antons Mozalevskis, Michael Ninburg, Ponsiano Ocama, Rosanna Peeling, Nick Walsh, Massimo G. Colombo and Philippa Easterbrook
Published: 1 November 2017


Map of countries with contributions to the hepatitis testing innovation contest

Abstract
Background
Innovation contests are a novel approach to elicit good ideas and innovative practices in various areas of public health. There remains limited published literature on approaches to deliver hepatitis testing. The purpose of this innovation contest was to identify examples of different hepatitis B and C approaches to support countries in their scale-up of hepatitis testing and to supplement development of formal recommendations on service delivery in the 2017 World Health Organization hepatitis B and C testing guidelines.

Methods
This contest involved four steps: 1) establishment of a multisectoral steering committee to coordinate a call for contest entries; 2) dissemination of the call for entries through diverse media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, email listservs, academic journals); 3) independent ranking of submissions by a panel of judges according to pre-specified criteria (clarity of testing model, innovation, effectiveness, next steps) using a 1-10 scale; 4) recognition of highly ranked entries through presentation at international conferences, commendation certificate, and inclusion as a case study in the WHO 2017 testing guidelines.

Results
The innovation contest received 64 entries from 27 countries and took a total of 4 months to complete. Sixteen entries were directly included in the WHO testing guidelines. The entries covered testing in different populations, including primary care patients (n = 5), people who inject drugs (PWID) (n = 4), pregnant women (n = 4), general populations (n = 4), high-risk groups (n = 3), relatives of people living with hepatitis B and C (n = 2), migrants (n = 2), incarcerated individuals (n = 2), workers (n = 2), and emergency department patients (n = 2). A variety of different testing delivery approaches were employed, including integrated HIV-hepatitis testing (n = 12); integrated testing with harm reduction and addiction services (n = 9); use of electronic medical records to support targeted testing (n = 8); decentralization (n = 8); and task shifting (n = 7).

Conclusion
The global innovation contest identified a range of local hepatitis testing approaches that can be used to inform the development of testing strategies in different settings and populations. Further implementation and evaluation of different testing approaches is needed.

Friday, November 3, 2017

Hepatitis C is a huge public health problem in Canada

Hepatitis C could be eliminated in Canada, but drug prices, screening barriers stand in the way
By Nicole Ireland, CBC News Posted: Nov 03, 2017 1:42 AM ET

In a presentation to the World Hepatitis Summit in Sao Paulo on Thursday, Hill said 90 per cent of hepatitis C patients can now be cured in 12 weeks, at a cost of about $50 US per patient...

For Feld, the larger barrier to curing the estimated 250,000 people infected with the virus in this country is the absence of a "targeted, well-structured national plan" to actually reach those patients...

Feld advocates broadening screening in Canada to everyone born between 1945 and 1975 — a practice recommended by the Canadian Liver Foundation but rejected by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care....

Read more... http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/hepatitis-c-can-be-cured-in-canada-1.4385172?cmp=rss