Showing posts with label hbv. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hbv. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Hepatitis C - Vosevi safe, effective in ‘triple-infected’ patients with HCV, HBV, HIV

Vosevi safe, effective in ‘triple-infected’ patients with HCV, HBV, HIV

PHILADELPHIA – The direct-acting antiviral Vosevi demonstrated an average sustained virologic response rate of 87% among patients who were “triple-infected” with hepatitis C genotype 3, hepatitis B and HIV, as presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

“Chronic hepatitis C treatment is no longer challenging in the era of DAAs with an SVR of up to 97%. However, triple infection treatment with HCV, HIV and hepatitis B has not been explored in real life situations,” Nimy John, MD, from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, said during her presentation.

American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting 
October 5, 2018 - October 10, 2018
See more from American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Lower liver-cancer risk seen with tenofovir treatment of chronic hepatitis B

Lower liver-cancer risk seen with tenofovir treatment of chronic hepatitis B
Last Updated: 2018-10-04

By Will Boggs MD
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treated with tenofovir is lower than in those treated with entecavir, according to a nationwide study from South Korea.

"Patients with CHB have about 1% risk of developing HCC," Dr. Young-Suk Lim from the University of Ulsan College of Medicine, in Seoul, told Reuters Health by email. "Once diagnosed with HCC, the overall prognosis of the patients is very poor, with 5-year survival rate of less than 30%. Therefore, prevention of HCC is of utmost importance in the management of CHB patients."

Entecavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), first-line antiviral agents for CHB infection, have similar efficacy for intermediate-term virologic, biochemical, serologic and histologic outcomes. Their relative efficacy in reducing HCC risk remains uncertain.

During follow-up, the incidence of HCC was significantly lower in the tenofovir group (0.64 per 100 person-years) than in the entecavir group (1.06 per 100 person-years), the researchers report in JAMA Oncology, online September 27....

Read the complete article here: 

In The Journal
JAMA Oncology, online September 27:
doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.4070

Editorial
doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.4039 

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Assembly Biosciences Announces Oral Presentation at 2018 AASLD

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 02, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Assembly Biosciences, Inc. (NASDAQ:ASMB), a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing innovative therapeutics targeting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and diseases associated with the microbiome, today announced that the company will have an oral presentation of the full data set from the Phase 1b study of ABI-H0731 at the upcoming American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Annual Meeting (The Liver Meeting®), being held November 9-13 in San Francisco.

The oral presentation at AASLD will review final results of the Phase 1b study in patients with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) infection, including safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABI-H0731 (or ‘731), as well as quantitative changes in HBV DNA, RNA and viral antigens. ABI-H0731 was safe and well tolerated, with dose dependent antiviral effects at doses ranging from 100 to 400 mg given orally once daily, and RNA declines paralleled the observed DNA declines. The company presented interim results of the study at the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) in April.

"We are pleased with the final results from the Phase 1b study, with viral load responses and a safety profile that solidly support our clinical strategy in the two Phase 2a trials currently underway in HBV patients," said Uri Lopatin, M.D., Chief Medical Officer. "Both trials are evaluating oral '731 at 300 mg once daily in combination with standard of care nucleos(t)ide therapy, with one trial enrolling treatment-experienced HBV patients with suppressed viral loads and the other enrolling treatment-naïve patients."

In July, the Company received FDA Fast Track Designation for ABI-H0731 and expects to report interim data from the Phase 2a trials during the first half of 2019. Assembly also plans to expand its clinical HBV pipeline later this year with the initiation of a Phase 1 study on its second, highly potent core inhibitor, ABI-H2158.

Oral Presentation
Title: Final Results of a Phase 1b 28-Day Study of ABI-H0731, a Novel Core Inhibitor, in Non-Cirrhotic Viremic Subjects with Chronic Hepatitis B

Session: Parallel 8: Novel Therapies for HBV
Room: 157/160, Moscone Center, North and South Buildings
Date:Sunday, November 11, 2018
Time:10:30am PT

Presenter: MF Yuen, MD, PhD, Chief of Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong

About Assembly Biosciences
Assembly Biosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing innovative therapeutics targeting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and diseases associated with the microbiome. The HBV program is focused on advancing a new class of potent, oral core inhibitors that have the potential to increase cure rates for chronically infected patients. The microbiome program is developing novel oral live synthetic biotherapeutic candidates with Assembly's fully integrated platform, including a robust process for strain identification and selection, GMP banking and production, and targeted delivery to the lower gastrointestinal tract with the GEMICEL® technology. For more information, visit assemblybio.com.

Forward-Looking Statements
The information in this press release contains forward-looking statements regarding future events, including statements about the clinical and therapeutic potential of core inhibitors, including ABI-H0731 and ABI-H2158, Assembly's development programs, the results of clinical trials being predictive of future clinical trials, the initiation, progress and results of Assembly's ongoing and planned clinical studies and the timing of these events. Certain forward-looking statements may be identified by reference to a future period or by use of forward-looking terminology such as "plan," "upcoming," "look forward," "will," "expected," and "potential." Assembly intends such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions contained in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Actual results or developments may differ materially from those projected or implied in these forward-looking statements. More information about the risks and uncertainties faced by Assembly are more fully detailed under the heading "Risk Factors" in Assembly's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2018 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as required by law, Assembly assumes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Friday, September 28, 2018

Hepatocellular carcinoma among US and non-US-born patients with chronic hepatitis B: Risk factors and age at diagnosis

Research Article

Hepatocellular carcinoma among US and non-US-born patients with chronic hepatitis B: Risk factors and age at diagnosis 
Kaitlyn Kennedy, Susan M. Graham, Nayan Arora, Margaret C. Shuhart, H. Nina Kim
Published: September 25, 2018
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0204031

Full-text
Download PDF
View Online 

Abstract
Background
Risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have not been well characterized among African immigrants with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We conducted a case-control study to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with HCC among a diverse cohort of patients with chronic HBV infection seen in a large academic health setting.

Methods
We identified a total of 278 patients with HCC and chronic HBV seen at two medical centers in a 14-year span from January 2002 to December 2015. These cases were age- and sex-matched in a 1:3 ratio with 823 non-cancer control subjects with chronic HBV. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of HCC by race, with black race stratified by African-born status, after adjusting for diabetes, HIV or HCV coinfection, alcohol misuse and cirrhosis.

Results
Of the 278 HCC cases, 67% were 60 years of age or older, 78% were male, 87% had cirrhosis and 72% were Asian. HIV infection was present in 6% of cases. Only 7% (19 of 278) of HCC cases were black, of whom 14 were African immigrants. The median age at HCC diagnosis was 44 years in Africans. Notably, nearly all (93%) of the African-born patients with HCC were diagnosed at an age younger than 60 years compared with 52% of Asian cases (P<0.001). The main factors independently associated with greater odds of HCC overall were Asian race (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–5.5) and cirrhosis (aOR 19.7, 95% CI 12.2–31.8).

Conclusion
African immigrants accounted for a small proportion of HBV-associated HCC cases overall compared with Asians but appeared to have greater likelihood of early-onset HCC. Optimal strategies for HCC prevention in these key subroups with chronic HBV warrant further study.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

How I Manage Low-Level Viremia in Patients Receiving HBV Therapy

How I Manage Low-Level Viremia in Patients Receiving HBV Therapy 
Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MP

An ongoing challenge is how to manage patients with HBV infection who have intermittent or persistent low-level viremia on treatment, but who do not meet the criteria for viral breakthrough. In my practice, I divide these patients into 2 groups: those with HBV that is detectable but not quantifiable (< 20 IU/mL) and those with HBV that is quantifiable (≥ 20 IU/mL).

Frequently, we see patients with test results reporting detectable but not quantifiable HBV levels, and I do not worry about these patients. In fact, many of these nonquantifiable readings are likely false positives.

However, I become concerned if the low-level viremia is quantifiable, even though this finding is much rarer in my practice. Although during the last 5 years the clinical community shifted from frequent use of combination therapy to monotherapy with entecavir or tenofovir even with intermittent low-level viremia, recent data indicate that quantifiable low-level viremia may be associated with worse outcomes, particularly in patients with cirrhosis....

Continue reading:

**Free registration required

Friday, September 14, 2018

Gilead targets hep B in half a billion dollar deal with Precision BioSciences

Gilead targets hep B in half a billion dollar deal with Precision BioSciences
Gemma Jones
14th September 2018
Biopharma looks to genome editing platform to discover hepatitis B cure
Following its success in curing hepatitis C with therapies such as Sovaldi and Harvoni, Gilead is now enlisting a new partner in the fight against hepatitis B (HBV).

Inking a collaboration deal that would be worth half a billion dollars with genome editing specialists Precision Biosciences, Gilead is aiming to develop a cure for HBV, which is proving more difficult to eliminate than hep C.

Thursday, August 23, 2018

CLD Updates: Hepatitis B Diagnosis, Treatment, HBV in Pregnancy And Guidelines

CLD Updates
Review the following hepatitis B articles in the latest issue of Clinical Liver Disease (CLD) available on Wiley Online Library. CLD is an official digital educational learning resource from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Visitors are able to watch author interviews, access full-text articles, and download files in either HTML or PDF formats.

Reviews
Hepatitis B
Tram Tran, MD 
Bo Hyun Kim , M.D., W. Ray Kim , M.D.
Pages: 1-4 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article

Kathy Jackson , B.App.Sci., Stephen Locarnini , M.B.B.S, Ph.D., B.Sc. (Hons), F.R.C. (Path), Robert Gish , M.D. 
Pages: 5-11 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article
Watch the interview with the author

Marc G. Ghany , M.D., M.HSc., Timothy M. Block , Ph.D. 
Pages: 12-18 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article

Joseph C. Ahn M.D., Joseph Ahn M.D., M.S., F.A.A.S.L.D., F.A.C.G., A.G.A.F.
Pages: 19-23 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article
Watch the interview with the author 

Tatyana Kushner M.D., M.S.C.E., Monika Sarkar M.D., M.A.S.
Pages: 24-28 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article 

Brian J. McMahon M.D. 
Pages: 29-32 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article 

Norah A. Terrault, Anna S. F. Lok, Brian J. McMahon, Kyong‐Mi Chang, Jessica P. Hwang, Maureen M. Jonas, Robert S. Brown Jr, Natalie H. Bzowej, John B. Wong 
Pages: 33-34 | First Published: 22 August 2018
Watch a video presentation of this article
Watch the interview with the author

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Hep C and B August Newsletters - Liver Wellness Tips & Generic Direct Acting Antivirals

News updated Aug 8, 2018

August Newsletters
Welcome folks! Read the latest hep B or C news in this months collection of newsletters, published monthly by a small group of kind people devoted to educating us all about liver disease. In addition, access new blog posts with information about major issues surrounding viral hepatitis, as well as tips for maintaining a healthy liver, again, provided by a handful of inspirational writers who blog just for you. Finally read today's news updated as the day progresses, check back for updates. 

Liver Wellness Tips
In honor of World Hepatitis Day, start with:10 TERRIFIC WAYS TO LOVE YOUR LIVER THIS SUMMER, a must read series covering everything from foods containing anti-inflammatory agents to liver-friendly yoga poses! Recently launched by Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation.

Today's News
GIS – 08 August 2018: The Ministry of Health and Quality of Life will organise a Conference on Hepatitis C in October 2018. 
The Conference will involve the participation of experts from the United Kingdom, Australia, Egypt and South Africa so as to guide the health care professionals on treatment and elimination of hepatitis C in Mauritius.

Its main objectives will be to educate the local doctors in the new treatments of hepatitis C and to develop a large scale treatment strategy for those who have been diagnosed. The Conference also aims at sourcing affordable tests for hepatitis C and developing a strategy for eliminating hepatitis C in Mauritius by 2025.

New PHE data shows a decrease in deaths from hepatitis C but diagnoses of advanced liver disease and related cancers remain stable.

Researchers have found that a group of viruses that cause severe stomach illness — including the one famous for widespread outbreaks on cruise ships — get transmitted to humans through membrane-cloaked “virus clusters” that exacerbate the spread and severity of disease.

The World and Everything in It: hospice for the homeless.
Death with dignity - WORLD Radio Blog
At age 50, Linda is dying of Hepatitis C that she contracted from needles while she was a heroin addict. Now the disease is causing her liver to fail. She's in a lot …

August 7
Express Scripts Holding Co. said it will drop 48 drugs next year from its closely watched lineup of covered therapies, including Gilead Sciences Inc.’s HIV treatment Atripla and AbbVie Inc.’s hot-selling Mavyret medicine for hepatitis C. Express Scripts said that next year it will cover Symfi, a new HIV combo pill from Mylan NV that the benefit manager said has a 40 percent lower list price than Atripla. Express Scripts will also cover Merck & Co.’s lower-cost hepatitis C medicine Zepatier. In July, Merck said that it was cutting its list price for the drug by 60 percent.

Seeking your help to end the HIV and hepatitis C epidemics and significantly reduce the incidence of STDs in California!
Aug 7, 2018
It is time for California to develop its own Ending the Epidemic plan! The California HIV/AIDS Policy Research Centers, together with viral hepatitis and STD organizations (including Project Inform), have launched a community-driven effort to inform development of a statewide plan to end the HIV and hepatitis C epidemics and significantly reduce the incidence of STDs.

"This is a lifesaver": Patients who accepted infected kidney transplants cured of hepatitis C
Some patients in desperate need of a kidney transplant participated in a bold experiment where they received organs infected with hepatitis C. The gamble paid off.

7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Dialysis patients waiting for kidney transplants might safely accept an organ from a donor infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), …

Publish date: August 7, 2018
By Mark S. Lesney ID Practitioner
Marked differences were seen in the composition of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) when comparing HIV-coinfected (CIP) with HCV-monoinfected (MIP) individuals, according to the results of a genetic analysis of nearly 300 patients.

Study: Alcohol Abuse Increases Risks in Patients with Hepatitis C
Aug 7, 2018
The interaction between alcohol abuse and hepatitis C virus (HCV) can ... The study noted that approximately 20% of patients with alcoholic hepatitis have HCV.

August 6
Healio - Aug 6, 2018
Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection died an average of 14 years ... evidence of diabetes (27.2%), a history of alcohol abuse (17.7%), hepatitis C or …

FDA gives drugmakers new ways to prove opioid disorder treatments work
By Steven Ross Johnson | August 6, 2018
Under the new draft guidance, drug developers can look beyond whether medication-assisted treatments reduce patients' opioid use. They can prove efficacy through drops in mortality, emergency department visits, or transmission of hepatitis C. Other measurable outcomes could include improvements in patients' ability to resume work or school, or by the share of patients with moderate to severe forms of opioid use disorder who go into remission while using the experimental MAT therapies.

Entecavir Associated With Later Virological Relapse Than Tenofovir
Aug 6, 2018
A comparison of the nucleos(t)ide analogues tenofovir and entecavir revealed that virological relapse occurred much later for people with a chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection who were e antigen negative after stopping entecavir, according to findings published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Ascletis Pharma Inc. (1672.HK) announced today Ravidasvir is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for the Care and Treatment of Persons Diagnosed with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection (July 2018) as a future pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals agent (DAA). Ascletis received the acceptance letter for Ravidasvir new drug application (NDA) from the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) on August 1.

Related: April 12, 2018
sofosbuvir/ravidasvir
The results indicate that the sofosbuvir/ravidasvir combination is comparable to the very best hepatitis C therapies available today, but it is priced affordably and could allow an alternative option in countries excluded from pharmaceutical company access programmes,” said Dr Bernard Pécoul, Executive Director, DNDi.

Integrating Treatments for Opioid Use Disorder and Infectious Diseases
Aug 6, 2018
All healthcare providers have a role in combating the opioid use disorder (OUD) epidemic and its infectious disease (ID) consequences, according to an article published in Annals of Internal Medicine

Britain plans for opt-out organ donation scheme to save lives
LONDON Britain plans to increase the number of organ donors by changing the rules of consent and presuming that people have agreed to transplants unless they have specifically opted out.

Read The Latest News
For a quick review of news, stroll over to the good people at HepCBC to read the latest issue of the Weekly Bull.

Journal Updates
Managing Neurologic Complications of Chronic HCV Infection
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause a multitude of extrahepatic complications, including neurologic manifestations. These complications can lead to substantial neuropsychiatric deficits, such as fatigue, cognitive impairment, restless legs syndrome, Parkinson's disease, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition to detecting and managing these neurologic complications, pharmacists in community settings can promote HCV screening, improve medication access and adherence, and recommend preventive strategies patients can use to avoid transmission of this widespread infection.

International Journal of Infectious Diseases
2 August 2018
Download: High Efficacy of Generic and Brand Direct Acting Antivirals in Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C.

August Updates On This Blog
New Articles Under: Other Conditions Related To HCV 
- Hepatitis C-Diabetes associated w-advanced fibrosis and progression in HCV non-genotype 3 patients
- Symptom burden, medical comorbidities, and functional well-being of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) initiating direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in real-world clinical settings 

New Articles Under: HCC during and after direct-acting antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C
- Direct Antiviral Therapy of Hep C May Not Boost Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk

New Articles Under: HCV-Statins 
- Statins: old drugs as new therapy for liver diseases?

New Articles Under: HCV-Education
- Long–term effect of liver fibrosis after SVR in patients with HCV 

July News
Spotlight on mortality trends in liver disease
One study looked at 10-year U.S. mortality trends related to chronic liver diseases, while another assessed mortality from cirrhosis and liver cancer in the U.S. from 1999 to 2016.
“It is clear that the introduction of oral, highly efficacious and well-tolerated antiviral agents has improved outcomes in patients with viral hepatitis,” they wrote. “However, future challenges with [alcoholic liver disease] and NAFLD will pose a different set of problems and will necessitate a multidisciplinary approach with a dedicated focus on minorities.”

Disparities in Access to Direct Acting Antiviral Regimens for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): The Impact of Race and Insurance Status 
Despite highly effective and well-tolerated regimens for treating hepatitis C virus (HCV), patients face barriers in accessing treatment. In addition to suboptimal HCV screening programs and lack of effective linkage-to-care, other barriers include strict requirements from some payers to cover treatment. This study reports insurance status and Hispanic ethnicity as predictors of not receiving treatment. 

“Coordinated care has the potential to improve access to treatment for individuals with hepatitis C who are naive to direct-acting antivirals; however, having Medicaid could hamper access, according to a recent study published in PLoSONE.”

People born between 1945 and 1975 are the group of people who are most likely to suffer from chronic hepatitis C in Canada, and Greg Powell is a Canadian who is part of those people. Greg contacted the hepatitis C in the 1980s, but the diagnosis came ten years later. Greg was already suffering from hemophilia B which is a hereditary bleeding disorder, so he needed to benefit from a series of blood transfusions.

Wayne Kuznar, for MDLinx
Nearly three fourths of patients who present with acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury (ALI) or failure (ALF) are women, according to findings from a North American registry. Women with acetaminophen overdose leading to ALI/ALF were more likely than men to present with high-grade hepatic encephalopathy and have critical care needs, and more likely to have psychiatric disease and to co-ingest sedating agents with acetaminophen.

Newsletters
HCV Advocate
The HCV Advocate newsletter is a valuable resource designed to provide the hepatitis C community with monthly updates on events, clinical research, and education.
Newsletter Highlights
August Issue
HealthWise – Hepatitis C and Sugar by Lucinda Porter, RN – Lucinda discusses effects of sugar on the body, hepatitis C, and fatty liver. 
(1) State Prisons Fail to Offer Cure to 144,000 Inmates with Deadly Hepatitis C
(2) What’s Being Done to Stop the Spread of Hepatitis A in the Midwest? 
SnapShots by Alan Franciscus: 
-Efficacy of sofosbuvir and velpatasvir, with and without ribavirin, in patients with HCV genotype 3 infection and cirrhosis
-Incidence and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C (HCV) in PWID at the Stockholm needle exchange – importance for HCV elimination
-Microenvironment eradication of hepatitis C: A novel treatment paradigm
-All‐oral direct‐acting antiviral therapy against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus/HCV–coinfected subjects in real‐world practice: Madrid coinfection registry findings
Abstract:  Use of ribavirin in viruses other than hepatitis C. A review of the evidence,
Genotype from Punjab, India: Expanding classification of hepatitis C virus into 8 genotypes

The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable
The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable (NVHR) is national coalition working together to eliminate hepatitis B and C in the United States.
Save the date: Webinar August 8th on Engaging Drug Users to Fight Stigma and Access HCV
On Wednesday, August 8, 2018
National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, the Urban Survivor's Union, the People’s Harm Reduction Alliance, and the Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition will be hosting a webinar; Engaging Drug Users to Fight Stigma and Access HCV. These groups are working collaboratively on the "More than Tested, Empowered" project which addresses barriers to hepatitis C care faced by individuals who use drugs. The webinar will include findings from surveys delivered to healthcare providers and suggested educational messaging to improve access to hepatitis C care. In addition, each partner will discuss their methods for integrating participants into their work. After the presentation, there will be time for questions and discussion. 

Need To Talk To Someone?
If you need information and resources about finding financial help to pay for low cost testing, or finding a free or low cost clinic, or financial help with payment for treatments, please call us. We know how to find doctors and support groups. We know how to help you find resources where you live. We have experienced hepatitis C ourselves or have supported patients living with hep C. We are peer counselors. Help-4-Hep is a trusted source of information, support and referrals—all free of charge to you.
Learn more about Help-4-Hep
View all NVHR newsletters

The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force
The New York City Hepatitis C Task Force is a city-wide network of service providers and advocates concerned with hepatitis C and related issues. The groups come together to learn, share information and resources, network, and identify hepatitis C related needs in the community. Committees form to work on projects in order to meet needs identified by the community.
July 27, 2018 - NY Governor Announces First-In-Nation Task Force To Eliminate Hepatitis C 
View: Hep Free NYC Newsletters
Review all news updates.

HCV Action
HCV Action brings together hepatitis C health professionals from across the patient pathway with the pharmaceutical industry and patient representatives to share expertise and good practice.
Aug 3, 2018
HCV Action e-update: July 2018

World Hepatitis Alliance
We run global campaigns, convene high-level policy events, build capacity and pioneer global movements, ensuring people living with viral hepatitis guide every aspect of our work.
View Recent Newsletters 
World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA) presents hepVoice, a monthly magazine with updates on the latest projects, news from WHA members and key developments in the field of hepatitis.

GI & Hepatology News
Over 17,000 gastroenterologists and hepatologists rely on GI & Hepatology News every month to cover the world of medicine with breaking news, on-site medical meeting coverage, and expert perspectives both in print and online. 
Hot topics
Lin Chang, MD
Publish date: August 1, 2018
Hepatitis B virus reactivation, endoscopic bariatric therapy, and more.
View all updates here....

Hep-Your Guide to Hepatitis
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis. Offering unparalleled editorial excellence since 2010, Hep and HepMag.com are the go-to source for educational and social support for people living with hepatitis.
View - all issues
Check out the talented people who blog at Hep.

Hepatitis Victoria
Hepatitis Victoria is the peak not-for-profit community organisation working across the state for people affected by or at risk of viral hepatitis.
Check out this new Liver Health app: 'Top app for liver health is LiverWELL' says influential U.S. health blogger.
View the Latest Newsletter, or relax and listen to a short podcasts interviewing health experts and practioners on topics related to viral hepatitis - come have a listen!

British Liver Trust
The British Liver Trust is the leading UK liver disease charity for adults – we provide information and support; increase awareness of how liver disease can be prevented and promote early diagnosis; fund and champion research and campaign for better services. 
News: Almost half of people with Hepatitis C in the UK are unaware
On Saturday 28th July, World Hepatitis Day, the British Liver Trust unites with organisations, health professionals and supporters across the world to push for urgent …
View Recent Newsletters, here.

National Institutes of Health
A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
August Newsletter
Topics
Loneliness Affects All Ages
Health Capsule - Preventing Shingles

Harvard Health
Ask the doctors

Inspirational Bloggers
Karen Hoyt is devoted to offering support and accurate information to people coping with the effects of hepatitis C.
Latest blog entry: Tired with Liver Disease: There’s a Nap for That

Lucinda K. Porter
Lucinda Porter is a nurse, speaker, advocate and patient devoted to increasing awareness about hepatitis C.
Latest blog entry: Wading Through Medicare

Hep 
Hep is an award-winning print and online brand for people living with and affected by viral hepatitis.
Latest blog entry: A World Without Hepatitis Advocates
Healing Your Fatty Liver

Hepatitis NSW 
We provide information, support, referral and advocacy for people affected by viral hepatitis in NSW. We also provide workforce development and education services both to prevent the transmission of viral hepatitis and to improve services for those affected by it.
Latest blog entry: Govt intervenes to keep hep C elimination on track

Life Beyond Hepatitis C
Life Beyond Hep C is where faith, medical resources and patient support meet, helping Hep C patients and their families navigate through the entire journey of Hep C.
Latest blog entry: Newly Diagnosed with Hepatitis C, What Do I Do Next?

CATIE Blog
A comprehensive website for HIV and hepatitis C information
Latest blog entry: Eliminating hepatitis C among Canadian immigrants and newcomers: how
CanHepC’s blueprint will impact my work.

Canadian Liver Foundation 
We strive to improve prevention and the quality of life of those living with liver disease by advocating for better screening, access to treatment, and patient care.
Latest blog entry: Life After Hepatitis C: A New Chapter

Pacific Hepatitis C Network
The Pacific Hepatitis C Network works with people living with hepatitis C, with community based organizations and with government to address concerns about hepatitis C prevention, care, treatment access and support.
Latest blog entry: A few words from PHCN’s President on World Hepatitis Day 2018

The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide.
Latest blog entry: - Newly Diagnosed with Hepatitis B? How Did I Get this? Learning the HBV Transmission Basics.

HepatitisC.net
At HepatitisC.net we empower patients and caregivers to take control of Hepatitis C by providing a platform to learn, educate, and connect with peers and healthcare professionals.
Latest blog entry: Should I Be Screened for Liver Cancer?

HIV and ID Observations  
An ongoing dialogue on HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, all matters medical, and some not so medical.
Latest blog entry: Really Rapid Review — International AIDS Conference 2018, Amsterdam

From The Archives 
SVR leads to significant improvement of liver fibrosis.
Research has shown people who are cured of their HCV infection experience a reduction in the rate of liver fibrosis progression, as well as improved liver function. For instance published in Antiviral Therapy/Aug 2017, evidence suggest HCV eradication or response to treatment (cure) is associated with regression of fibrosis and recovery of liver function which can be detected as early as end of treatment, check out the article: SVR in HCV leads to an early and significant improvement of liver fibrosis. In this more recent study presented at the 2018 Liver Congress researchers reported; Sustained & continued improvement in hepatic fibrosis beyond the first-year (& in the subsequent 3 years) following HCV treatment. Finally, published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics/May 29, 2018 researchers reported: anti-viral therapy reduced liver fibrosis and steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus.

Healthy You
Simple swaps to eat less salt
The top 10 sources of sodium in the American diet include processed foods that contain several high-sodium ingredients, such as cheese and cured meats

Diet Heavy in Meat Boosts NAFLD Risk
Large study shows 40% increased risk in overweight, elderly patients

Probiotic use is a link between brain fogginess, severe bloating
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University
While probiotics can be beneficial in some scenarios, like helping a patient restore his gut bacteria after taking antibiotics, the investigators advised caution against its excessive and indiscriminate use.

"Probiotics should be treated as a drug, not as a food supplement," Rao says, noting that many individuals self-prescribe the live bacteria, which are considered good for digestion and overall health.... 

August 6, 20184:58 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition 
New research suggests the mix of microbes in our guts can either help — or hinder — weight-loss efforts.



Watch: Liver Function Tests
The ACG now suggests that "liver function tests" be referred to as "liver chemistries" or "liver tests.
The reasoning behind the name change is "Liver Function Tests" are not true measures of hepatic function. Listen to this 2017 short podcast hosted by Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH to learn more about test guidelines.

Recently, Lab Tests Online AU uploaded the following video explaining commonly used tests to check liver function such as; alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and bilirubin tests. The ALT and AST tests measure enzymes that your liver releases in response to damage or disease.



Thanks for stopping by!
Tina

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Hepatitis B—stopping a silent killer

Hepatitis B—stopping a silent killer

July 11, 2018, University of Michigan

Every year, hepatitis B kills more than 780,000 people around the world, and is the single most serious liver infection, according to the World Health Organization.

David Hutton, associate professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, says early diagnosis and treatment is key to stopping the spread of the disease in the United States.

He co-authored a study published in Health Affairs that shows testing and treating immigrants from high-risk countries living in the U.S. could help dramatically improve their long-term quality of life, reduce hepatitis B-related diseases such as liver cancer and cirrhosis, and save money in the long term.

What is hepatitis B and who does it affect?

Hutton: Hepatitis B is a blood-borne viral infection that affects the liver. It’s pretty contagious and can be transmitted by blood or bodily fluids, so through things like sharing razors and toothbrushes. It’s been called the silent killer because it is asymptomatic—you might have the virus but not know until it manifests itself until much later.

In the United States, there aren’t that many people who actually acquire hepatitis B because since the early 1980s we’ve been pretty good about vaccinating people and if you’re vaccinated at birth, it’s very good at preventing mother-to-child transmission and also transmission in early childhood. Right now, chronic hepatitis B affects largely nonwhite foreign-born people from Asia and Africa.

How about at a global level?

Hutton: There are a lot of countries where prevalence of hepatitis B is higher because it’s historically been more prevalent there, and because there have been delays and not very good coverage of the hepatitis B vaccine. So, for example, in China it was only made as part of their national immunization plan and made free in the last 10 to 15 years. People who are in their 30s or 40s from China and who immigrated to the United States probably weren’t vaccinated at birth and probably were exposed to hepatitis B from their mothers or friends.

How can you diagnose, treat and cure hepatitis B?

Hutton: There is no cure for hepatitis B. Many people do not know they have it because it usually takes decades for it to manifest itself in terms of cirrhosis or liver cancer, which are very nasty, difficult to treat and have high impacts on quality of life and high mortality.

The good news is there are antiviral treatments. I like to think of it as similar to HIV treatments, so you’re going to be taking pills for the rest of your life. But they’re highly effective and they have very few side effects.

So it’s certainly a disease that can be managed and, if treated, it dramatically reduces the viral load and reduces liver complications like cirrhosis and liver cancer. But because it can be asymptomatic, the key is in testing.

Tell me about your research. Why did you focus on immigrants?

Hutton: We wanted to look at the cost-effectiveness and population health impact of an increase in diagnosis, care and treatment of hepatitis B to meet the World Health Organization’s goals for 2030.

Because the majority of the estimated 1.29 million people living with hepatitis B in the U.S. are adults who, particularly in the Asian and black populations, were born abroad, we developed a model to simulate the prevalence of foreign-born Asian and black adults currently living in the U.S. and projected migration from high-risk areas.

We calculated the costs of screening—either by their personal doctors, through community organizations or health care systems—and examined three diagnosis, care and treatment scenarios to calculate the costs.

What were the results?

Hutton: Based on our analysis, if we met WHO targets for diagnosis and treatment by 2030 (having 90 percent of cases diagnosed and 80 percent treated), we would reduce deaths by 37 percent, reduce liver cancer by 35 percent and decompensated cirrhosis by 51 percent. And, depending on the cost of antiviral drugs, the measures could actually save money.

One of the measurements of health we use is a quality-adjusted life-year. It is a way of aggregating together the loss of quality of life and length of life onto a single measure where one quality-adjusted life-year is equivalent to one year in perfect health. We calculated that meeting these targets would result in 474,000 quality-adjusted life-years gained. At current treatment costs, meeting these goals would mean a net increase in costs of $49 million. But, that means we are only paying $103 per quality-adjusted life-year. We routinely spend more than $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained on other medical interventions. For example, screening all women aged 40-80 annually for breast cancer costs $58,000 per additional quality-adjusted life-year gained. If we achieve the hepatitis B goals earlier or if the treatment cost drop, meeting these WHO goals could be cost-saving.

Why do you think testing is so important?

Hutton: A lot of public health interventions don’t save money. This is one of those rare cases where the intervention actually can save money over the long run and improves people’s quality of life. Over the long run, if you’re going to prevent cirrhosis or liver cancer, and the need for liver transplants—those can get very, very expensive—you’re going to save money and improve people’s lives, especially in these sometimes underrepresented and marginalized groups.

What do you hope people learn from your study?

Hutton: If they are immigrants from Africa and Asia who are in the U.S. but have not been tested, they should get tested as soon as possible. Testing is very simple. And if you find that you have hepatitis B, know that is a manageable treatment that can be very valuable at preventing terrible liver disease.

Monday, July 2, 2018

$20 blood test could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment

$20 blood test could help diagnose hepatitis B patients across Africa
Imperial College London
A simple $20 blood test could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment in some of Africa's poorest regions.

Researchers have developed an accurate diagnostic score that consists of inexpensive blood tests to identify patients who require immediate treatment against the deadly hepatitis B virus - which can lead to liver damage or cancer (1).

The score consists of two simple blood tests: one measuring presence of antigens, proteins produced by the virus, and another for enzymes produced by the liver in response, to accurately assess patients for treatment.

The score was found to be as accurate as existing methods for identifying the patients in need of immediate treatment but at a fraction of the cost, $20 compared to $100-500 for current tests.

It is also far more accessible than existing methods - such as liver biopsy or HBV DNA, a much more complicated blood sample analysis - which requires resources and laboratories that are not always accessible in sub-Saharan Africa.

Researchers from Imperial College London and Medical Research Council Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, collaborating with the Pasteur Institute in Paris and other African and European institutions, used data from hundreds of hepatitis B patients in The Gambia who were part of the PROLIFICA (Prevention of Liver Fibrosis and Cancer in Africa) study.

Clinical data from more than 800 hepatitis B patients, who had been tested through the PROLIFICA programme, were used to develop this new score.

The tests were then validated with data from African patients in Senegal, Burkina Faso, Germany, France and the UK. The results are published in the Journal of Hepatology.

The new diagnostic test, called TREAT-B, was found to accurately identify HBV positive patients who require treatment in 85% of cases (called sensitivity), and could accurately identify those who do not need treatment in 77% of cases (called the specificity).

The scientists say that further research is needed but if the test is successful in larger studies it could be used widely to identify patients in need of hepatitis B treatment and refer thousands of people for life-saving treatment. The test could also be developed further to be implemented as a finger-prick test, similar to those used to detect HIV, to get quicker results.

The researchers also discovered that the diagnosis method worked at all stages of the disease - meaning that people in the early stages of liver disease without symptoms could also be screened and identified.

Imperial's Dr Maud Lemoine, co-author of the study, said: "These results show that this simple and inexpensive test could be an accurate way to diagnoses patients in need of hepatitis B treatment in countries with limited resources.

"This could potentially help diagnose and subsequently treat thousands of people across Africa."

Co-author, Yusuke Shimakawa from the Pasteur Institute said: "Once these results are validated by further studies, they could be potentially integrated into the WHO guidelines and local guidelines - and implemented in daily practice.

"There is great potential to diagnose more people and improve access to treatment.

Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem and in 2013 an estimated 1.45 million people died from the virus. It is the seventh leading cause of death worldwide and about half of deaths are attributable to the hepatitis B virus infection.

The hepatitis B virus infects around 250 million people worldwide, and is transmitted through blood and bodily fluids. In Africa, it is commonly transferred from mother to baby during birth or between children. However the virus causes no immediate symptoms, and can remain undetected in the body for decades until triggering severe complications such as liver damage (cirrhosis) and cancer.

The region most affected by hepatitis B is Sub-Saharan Africa, where around 80 million people are infected. 

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/187009/new-test-could-diagnose-hepatitis-patients/

Thursday, June 21, 2018

60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis, nearly 75% percent don't know it


7 in 10 people with liver disease in the UK don’t even know they have it 
Although over 60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, nearly 75% percent don't know it, according to research published in the Lancet. For many, the first indication is following admission to Accident and Emergency when the disease is advanced and chance of survival is very low. This week, 18th to 24th June, is Love Your Liver week, and the British Liver Trust has launched a new version of an online screening tool so that people can find out if they are at risk.

Although over 60,000 adults in the UK have cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, nearly 75% percent don't know it, according to research published in the Lancet. For many, the first indication is following admission to Accident and Emergency when the disease is advanced and chance of survival is very low. This week, 18th to 24th June, is Love Your Liver week, and the British Liver Trust has launched a new version of an online screening tool so that people can find out if they are at risk.

Liver disease is one of the leading causes of premature death in England and is responsible for more than 1 in 10 deaths of people in their 40s.

Professor Nick Sheron, a liver expert from the University of Southampton involved in the research, said: "Liver disease develops silently with no signs or symptoms and is the second leading cause of years or working life lost. If current trends continue it become the leading cause of premature mortality in the UK. Yet, most people with fatal advanced liver disease only become aware that they have a liver problem when they are admitted as an emergency. We MUST diagnose these people much earlier."

Liver problems develop silently with no obvious symptoms in the early stages yet the disease is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. The Love Your Liver awareness campaign, promoted by the British Liver Trust, aims to reach the one in five people in the UK who may have the early stages of liver disease, but are unaware of it.

More than 90% of liver disease is due to three main risk factors: obesity, alcohol and viral hepatitis.

Judi Rhys, Chief Executive, British Liver Trust said, “Helping people understand how to reduce their risk of liver damage is vital to address the increase in deaths from liver disease. Although the liver is remarkably resilient, if left too late damage is often irreversible. I would urge everyone to take our online screener on our website to see if they are at risk.”

The British Liver Trust’s Love Your Liver campaign focuses on three simple steps to Love Your Liver back to health:

- Drink within recommended limits and have three consecutive alcohol-free days every week
- Cut down on sugar, carbohydrates and fat and take more exercise
- Know the risk factors for viral hepatitis and get tested or vaccinated if at risk

Finding out your risk of liver disease only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Take the British Liver Trust’s screener here

Liver disease is one of the leading causes of premature death in England and is responsible for more than 1 in 10 deaths of people in their 40s.

Professor Nick Sheron, a liver expert from the University of Southampton involved in the research, said: "Liver disease develops silently with no signs or symptoms and is the second leading cause of years or working life lost. If current trends continue it become the leading cause of premature mortality in the UK. Yet, most people with fatal advanced liver disease only become aware that they have a liver problem when they are admitted as an emergency. We MUST diagnose these people much earlier."

Liver problems develop silently with no obvious symptoms in the early stages yet the disease is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. The Love Your Liver awareness campaign, promoted by the British Liver Trust, aims to reach the one in five people in the UK who may have the early stages of liver disease, but are unaware of it.

More than 90% of liver disease is due to three main risk factors: obesity, alcohol and viral hepatitis.

Judi Rhys, Chief Executive, British Liver Trust said, “Helping people understand how to reduce their risk of liver damage is vital to address the increase in deaths from liver disease. Although the liver is remarkably resilient, if left too late damage is often irreversible. I would urge everyone to take our online screener on our website to see if they are at risk.”

Finding out your risk of liver disease only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Take the British Liver Trust’s screener here

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Hepatitis Awareness Month - What is hepatitis C? What about hepatitis B or A?


Featured on the blog today in honor of Hepatitis Awareness Month, is a look at three common viruses that cause hepatitis, brought to you by Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), health experts, advocates, and patient bloggers, who work hard to spread information and awareness about viral hepatitis.

Hepatitis C
Lets start with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a virus that once caused serious damage to my liver, putting me at risk for liver-related complications. The good news is after testing; it all starts with getting tested for HCV, I went on to successfully treat the virus. The bad news is close to 50% of people who have HCV have not yet been diagnosed. Why not take this opportunity to learn more about viral hepatitis, or better yet, have a long frank discussion with "yourself" about getting tested.

Young Or Not So Young - The Risk 
Today we have two different groups of people that are at risk for hepatitis C, young people who have injected drugs and well, older people. We know that the hepatitis C epidemic peaked between 1940 and 1965 due in part because of hospital transmissions caused by the practice of reusing needles. So if you are at risk for HCV, rather you are young or part of the baby boomer generation; people born between 1945 and 1965, I hope you consider getting tested for HCV.

Hepatitis C Risk Factors
-IV drug use, sharing needles and syringes; Spike in HCV Linked to Opioid Injection Hits Young Adults Hardest
-Vertical transmission from mother to baby; HCV in Pregnant Women on Rise Increased risk of HCV infected infants.
-You were born from 1945 through 1965
-Extensive surgical procedures
-Needlestick injuries in health care settings
- Recipients of donated blood, blood products, and organs (once a common means of transmission but now rare in the United States since blood screening became available in 1992)
-People who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987
-Hemodialysis patients or persons who spent many years on dialysis for kidney failure
-Other possible risk behaviors: tattoos, body piercing, living and medical care in a developing country, folk medicine, intranasal cocaine
-Sexual transmission, rare; the risk of sexual transmission to an individual is probably less than 3% when a person is in a stable monogamous relationship - Unless you also have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
-Sharing personal care items, such as razors or toothbrushes, that may have come in contact with the blood of an infected person
-Unknown--up to 5% of patients have no identifiable risk factors

May 19th is Hepatitis Testing Day! 

Are You At Risk For Viral Hepatitis?
Find out if you should get tested or vaccinated by taking a quick, online Hepatitis Risk Assessment, developed by the CDC and get a personalized report.

Hepatitis C - A Few Facts
Of every 100 people infected with hepatitis C, 75 to 85 will develop chronic disease and 10-20 will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20-30 years. Early on HCV doesn't always have noticeable symptoms but overtime and with certain co-factors the virus can lead to serious liver problems, including cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) or liver cancer. Almost 80 percent of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are due to underlying chronic hepatitis B and C infection, and 80 to 90 percent of people with HCC have liver cirrhosis. According to the recent EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines: Management of hepatocellular carcinoma; Vaccination against hepatitis B reduces the risk of HCC and is recommended for all new-borns and high-risk groups. In patients with chronic hepatitis, antiviral therapies leading to maintained HBV suppression in chronic hepatitis B and sustained viral response in hepatitis C are recommended, since they have been shown to prevent progression to cirrhosis and HCC development.

Show Me The Guidelines

Current EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines
During The International Liver Congress 2018, The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) released updated practice guidelines to help physicians, as well as patients manage and treat HCV. (Link) EASL Practice Guidelines - Hepatitis C 2018, Decompensated Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Alcoholic Liver Disease & Hepatitis E.

Current AASLD Clinical Practice Guidelines
The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) with the International Antiviral Society developed a living document with ever evolving guidelines to treat HCV. The guidelines break down treatment according to liver damage and HCV genotype, updated when new HCV drugs are approved, or new real world data is established.

Help - Where Do I Begin?

Talk To Someone
Help‑4‑Hep is a non-profit, peer-to-peer helpline where counselors work with patients to meet the challenges of hepatitis C head-on. Callers talk one-to-one with a real person, typically someone who's had hepatitis C touch their own life. And they talk about the specifics of their particular situation. The phone call, support and information are all provided free of charge. Let us help you cut through the clutter and confusion. Call toll-free: 877‑Help‑4‑Hep (877‑435‑7443).
Begin here.......

Where To Get Tested - Hepatitis C and Hepatitis B

Find A HCV Specialist 
Find a Specialist In Your Area

Hepatitis B 
More than 2 million Americans are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), to learn more about HBV visit The Hepatitis B Foundation, for patients it's the best site for easy to understand information, here are a few links to get you started: 

What Is Hepatitis B?
Facts and Figures
Symptoms
Transmission
Acute vs. Chronic Infection
Commonly Asked Questions
The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis
Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B
Hepatitis Delta Coinfection
Hepatitis C Coinfection
HIV/AIDS Coinfection

AASLD 2018 hepatitis B guidance
Update on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ACIP Hepatitis B Vaccine Recommendations | CDC
You may have questions about the hepatitis A virus (HAV) after reading about HAV outbreaks across the US; Michigan, California, Indiana, Kentucky and Utah. The outbreak began in California in 2017, this year Michigan, Utah, and Kentucky have reported outbreaks with a high number of cases. Here is a Public Service Announcement from San Diego County Health & Human Services Agency on HAV prevention.


Immunization Action Coalition

Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers Information about the disease and vaccines
Read how hepatitis A is spread, the symptoms, how serious the virus is, when and who should get vaccinated.

CDC
I think I have been exposed to hepatitis A. What should I do?
If you have any questions about potential exposure to hepatitis A, call your health professional or your local or state health department. If you were recently exposed to hepatitis A virus and have not been vaccinated against hepatitis A, you might benefit from an injection of either immune globulin or hepatitis A vaccine. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure. A health professional can decide what is best based on your age and overall health.

What is postexposure prophylaxis (PEP)?
Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) refers to trying to prevent or treat a disease after an exposure. For hepatitis A, postexposure prophylaxis is an injection of either immune globulin or hepatitis A vaccine. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective in preventing hepatitis A if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure.
Begin here.......

Blog Updates: The ABCs Of Viral Hepatitis

Swedish Medical Center
What is hepatitis C, and how does it differ from hepatitis A or B?
By 2030, the World Health Organization wants to have hepatitis C eliminated from the planet. A key to reaching that goal is to create awareness of the disease among baby boomers, who suffer from it in larger numbers compared to the rest of the population, as well as those with increased lifestyle risks. But what is hepatitis C, and what can be done to reduce its numbers? Kris Kowdley, MD, director of the Liver Care Network and Organ Care Research at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, WA, discusses hepatitis C in detail.
View the article here: https://www.swedish.org/blog/2018/05/ask-the-expert-all-about-hepatitis-c

HEP Blogs
Go-to online source for educational and social support for people living with hepatitis. The website is devoted to combating the stigma and isolation surrounding hepatitis.

What are the Different Types of Hepatitis?
May 9, 2018 • By Connie M. Welch
Viral hepatitis is a liver infection that causes inflammation and damage. There are 5 viruses that cause viral hepatitis, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A and E viruses can cause acute infections (infections that last less than 6 months). Hepatitis B, C, and D viruses can cause acute and chronic (lasting longer than 6 months and typically ongoing) liver infections.

Awareness
Get Organized for Hepatitis Awareness Month 
By Lucinda K. Porter, RN
Raising hepatitis awareness is a great deal more fun if you participate with others. Here are some tips.


HepatitisC.net
Hep C Daily Blog, Experts & Community

By Karen Hoyt · May 7, 2018
So, you are hanging out with the same crowd that you always have. They’re like your family. In many ways, they are closer to you than your own family.

The Fallout Guide for Hep C: Support Network
By Rick Nash · May 2, 2018
I am lucky after my transplant, I carry that reminder on my stomach. Because when someone hears you have a condition, they may not initially understand the reality of how that affects you.
This is part two of a six-part series, view part one here.

All updates: https://hepatitisc.net/community/

Hep B Blog
The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide.

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month
Hepatitis Awareness Month is dedicated to increasing awareness of hepatitis in the United States and to encourage high risk populations to get tested. If you’re not sure how you can get involved in the hepatitis B community this month, here are some ways you can!

Information On Hep B Blog:
Hepatitis B Diagnosis & Monitoring
Hepatitis B Prevention
Hepatitis B Treatment
Liver Cancer
Living with Hepatitis B
News

    Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation
    The Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides resources, education and information related to screening, the prevention of and treatment for the Hepatitis Virus and Liver Cancer.

    A New York Post article about an unsafe “pizza joint manager” — who was reported to have sparked hepatitis C scare — made a few rounds on the panicked social media circuit earlier this year.


    Healio
    Healio features the industry’s best news reporting, dynamic multimedia, question-and-answer columns, CME and other educational activities in a variety of formats, quick reference content, blogs, and peer-reviewed journals. A quick free registration may be required.

    Hepatitis Awareness Month: 10 recent reports on viral hepatitis
    May 8, 2018
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have designated May as Hepatitis Awareness Month to raise public awareness of viral hepatitis including the most common strains: hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Additionally, the CDC designated May 19th as Hepatitis Testing Day. The following recent reports, many from recent meetings including the International Liver Congress 2018, include new research data on hepatitis prevalence and outbreaks, transmission risks and treatment outcomes...

    May 9, 2018
    Physicians should consider administering hepatitis A vaccines to their patients with hepatitis B and those with hepatitis C, according to a…

    Viral Hepatitis - An Overview
    By Osmosis
    What is the hepatitis virus? Well, the hepatitis virus invades liver cells and causes inflammation in the liver tissue. There are five known hepatitis viruses—hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, hepatitis D, and hepatitis E, all of which have slightly different presentations, symptoms and severity.


    Do you want to know your status? If you fall under any of the above mentioned risk groups please consider getting tested.

    Tina