Showing posts with label HCV next. Show all posts
Showing posts with label HCV next. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

HCV Next: Physicians Diagnosing,Treating HCV Define New Role in Opioid Crisis


Check out the July/August issue of HCV Next, just released online at Healio

Table of Contents
Cover Story 
Physicians Diagnosing,Treating HCV Define New Role in Opioid Crisis
The opioid epidemic in the United States has affected millions, exposing them to health risks that include a range of infectious diseases.

Feature
Point-of-Care HCV Assays: A Turning Point for Decentralized Diagnosis
Compared with traditional hepatitis virological tests, the benefit of point-of-care diagnostics is their use in patient care sites such as outpatient clinics, intensive care units, emergency departments and medical laboratories. Additionally, certain low- and middle-income countries have made use of point-of-care tests in blood banks.

In the Journals Plus
Most iatrogenic HCV cases unidentified until symptom onset
Insurance denials for HCV therapy increase in US

Meeting News
HCV outcomes worse for patients with public insurance, Medicaid
Homeless veterans with HCV diagnosed, treated via PCP outreach

Trend Watch

Begin here.....

On This Blog
The controversy over expensive new drugs for hepatitis C
Link to research and news articles addressing the high cost of hepatitis C drugs; insurance restrictions - private insurers/Medicaid - and availability of generic versions.

Elsewhere
Efficacy of Generic Oral DAAs in Patients With HCV Infection
Journal of Viral Hepatitis, July 20, 2018

Thursday, May 17, 2018

HCV Next overview from EASL 2018: Dr. Reau’s summary of key HCV data & real-world studies

May/June 2018 Issue
PCPs will play critical role in future HCV treatments
View the latest issue of HCV NEXT, published online at Healio

HCV Next is a monthly publication offering patients the latest research, news and commentary on liver disease and viral hepatitis.

Table of Contents
The Take Home
The Take Home: International Liver Congress 2018
Nancy S. Reau, MD
This year, although there was much buzz about hepatitis B virus (HBV) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatitis C virus (HCV) still held a prominent place in the oral presentations. As clinicians, we can take home some new data about 8-week regimens, real-world data, treatment failures and retreatments and how sustained virologic response affects both hepatocellular carcinoma risk as well as the risk for extrahepatic malignancies.

Editorial
International Liver Congress Offers Insight on the ‘Social Science’ of HCV
Ira M. Jacobson, MD
This month’s issue has a very nice summary of the data on therapeutic regimens presented at the International Liver Congress by Nancy S. Reau, MD. For me, the meeting highlighted how high is the summit to which we’ve climbed after years of a massive international effort to cure HCV, and how much the focus is shifting. We heard little about new HCV regimens and instead focused on real-world data sets on existing regimens and, equally important, the theme that HCV treatment has become as much of as social science as a medical one as we strive toward elimination. We saw an appropriate emphasis being placed on screening, linkage and access to care, including underprivileged and high-risk populations, on a national and global scale.

HCV hospitalizations increasing among baby boomers, men, drug users

PCPs will play critical role in future HCV treatments

In the Journals Plus
HCV finger-stick test accurate, gives results in 1 hour

View the Current Issues
HCV Next
Infectious Diseases in Children
Infectious Disease News

Monday, February 5, 2018

Managing the Fruits of HCV Cure: How Much Care do the Cured Need?

In case you missed it

The following article appeared in the January/February print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio

Editorial
Managing the Fruits of HCV Cure: How Much Care do the Cured Need?

The feature by Eric Lawitz, MD, very nicely encapsulates the revolutionary changes occurring within hepatitis C therapy over the past few years. As he explains, this extraordinary newfound ability to cure almost all patients with chronic HCV raises many questions about clinical outcomes.

We’ve felt strongly for years that it was unjust to deny therapy to patients who didn’t have “sufficiently advanced scarring of the liver to warrant treatment” — a cost-based position that was anathema to most clinicians and patients. Today, there’s a wealth of literature showing fibrosis progression stabilizes or reverses after achieving SVR. Even patients with cirrhosis may have regression of cirrhosis after SVR. But an additional dimension of HCV infection about which our knowledge has dramatically expanded is the potential for extrahepatic morbidity and mortality associated with HCV infection, and the opportunity to ameliorate or prevent such outcomes by effecting virologic cure — problems such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, renal disease, cryoglobulinemia, lymphoma and others.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Women with HCV face low ovarian reserve, infertility, miscarriage

Women with HCV face low ovarian reserve, infertility, miscarriage
Karampatou A, et al. J Hepatol. 2017;doi:10.1016/j.jhep.2017.08.019.
September 11, 2017

Women of child-bearing age with hepatitis C showed early signs of menopause, putting them at greater risk for infertility, gestational diabetes and miscarriage, according to a recently published study. Sustained virologic response positively impacted these outcomes.

Read More

Free registration may be required 

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Examined - Coverage of all HCV treatment regimens in state Medicaid fee-for-service programs and managed care organizations

"HCV Next" offers information on a range of liver topics, which include diagnosis, new combination therapies, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the May/June print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.

Table of Contents
Call to Action: Physicians Needed to Alleviate HCV Treatment Restrictions
Robert Greenwald, JD
In our report, Hepatitis C: The State of Medicaid Access, co-written and produced by the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School and the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, we examined coverage of all HCV treatment regimens in state Medicaid fee-for-service programs and managed care organizations. What we found is some improvement in treatment access since 2014, but that many Medicaid programs continue to restrict access to HCV treatments using medically unjustifiable requirements....
Sitting among the sessions at the International Liver Congress in Amsterdam, I had the distinct feeling that we are reaching an end to the era of revolutionary change in hepatitis C, but there remained impressive data, engaging debates and ongoing research given to us to better serve our patients. For those of us long involved in this field, we rejoice with our patients, often on a daily basis, and we intend to remain heavily engaged in addressing the remaining issues even as we heed the clarion call to immerse ourselves ever more deeply in the attempts to conquer other prevalent liver diseases...

AMSTERDAM — Achieving global elimination of hepatitis C requires actionable plans and changes on many levels of society from allowance of non-specialist prescribing to universal access, a group of experts explained at the International Liver Congress.
AMSTERDAM — Adherence to treatment and subsequent sustained virologic response were unaffected by drug use in a study of patients enrolled in an opioid agonist treatment program, according to a presenter at the International Liver Congress...

The Big Picture
Peer-to-Peer: Take Small Steps to Everyday Advocacy
Stacey Trooskin, MD, PhD
When we started using interferon-free regimens for the first time — for us, it was off-label with simeprevir/sofosbuvir (Olysio, Janssen/Sovaldi, Gilead Sciences) — to treat our many patients with HIV coinfection, we found ourselves restricted by insurance companies...

Thursday, April 20, 2017

April - HCV Next: HCC After DAAs Requires More Study, but no Cause for Withheld Treatment

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/news/print/hcv-next
"HCV Next" offers information on a range of topics, which include diagnosis, new combination therapies, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the April print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.


Recommended Reading
Meeting Coverage Healio
International Liver Congress

International Liver Congress™ 2017
Updates On This Blog

Updated April 20, 2017
Liver Cancer After Treatment For Hepatitis C
​Research demonstrates that while SVR markedly reduced liver-related complications and liver cancer, some long-term risk for liver cancer remained in those who were cured of Hepatitis C. But after direct-acting antiviral therapy does the risk of developing liver cancer increase?

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

HCV Next March Issue - Patient Reported Outcomes Critical in the Fight Against HCV

http://www.healio.com/hepatology/news/print/hcv-next
"HCV Next" offers information on a range of topics, which include diagnosis, new combination therapies, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the March print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.

Table of Contents

When patients are cured, they live longer and feel better. They will have less complications of advanced liver disease and their work productivity improves, which could potentially reduce the economic impact of HCV infection.





Zobair M. Younossi, MD, MPH


March issue of HCV Next

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

HCV Next Cover Story - 2017 A Year in Transition

http://www.healio.com/hepatology/news/print/hcv-next
2017: A Year in Transition

"HCV Next" features cutting edge news on the latest HCV research developments. With in-depth articles on a range of topics; diagnosis, hepatitis c treatment regimens, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the January 2017 print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.

Table of Contents
5 Questions
A Conversation With Robert Gish, MD

Cover Story
2017: A Year in Transition
Cover Story     
Throughout 2016, the remarkable success of direct-acting agents was confirmed and extended. Several new drugs — including Epclusa (Gilead), Zepatier (Merck), Daklinza (Bristol-Myers Squibb), Technivie (AbbVie), Viekira Pak (AbbVie) and Viekira XR (AbbVie) — were approved, representing continued remarkable potency of the DAA agents with the added bonus of extension into more pangenotypic activity. While there are still many other new drugs in development with the same trend toward increased potency and pangenotypic activity, it seems that drug development is starting to plateau. This ultimately will leave us with a strong armamentarium from which to choose the best agents for each of our individual patients.

Michael S. Saag, MD
Drug Pipeline
HCV 2016 Timeline





Monday, December 26, 2016

Hepatitis C - Screening for HCC in the Post-SVR12 Setting

2018 - Updates
Letter to the editor
Jan 2018

SVR Reduced HCC by 71%
from Jules: there never was any doubt that SVR would reduce or eliminate risk for HCC. In this study cirrhosis prior to treatment had a higher HCC risk then for those without cirrhosis, but that is to be expected and merely reinforces how crucial it is to treat HCV as early as possible...
Full Text

Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C did not correlate with an increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma in a large cohort study of both treated and untreated patients with or without cirrhosis. Those with incident HCC after DAA treatment had higher risk factors at baseline.

Dec 2016
Healio
The following articles appeared in the December print edition of HCV NEXT, published online at Healio.






Saturday, November 12, 2016

AASLD 2016 Dr. Gonzalez on Cost-Benefit of Treating Hepatitis C in HCC Patients Before Transplant

Dr. Gonzalez on Cost-Benefit of Treating Hepatitis C in HCC Patients Before Transplant

Stevan A. Gonzalez, MD MS, clinical assistant professor, department of internal medicine, Texas A&M College of Medicine, medical director of liver transplantation, Simmons Transplant Institute, Baylor All Saints Medical Center, discusses a cost effectiveness analysis of treating hepatitis C patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before or after a liver transplant

See more at: OncLiveTV




Source - http://www.onclive.com/conference-coverage/aasld-2016/dr-gonzalez-on-costbenefit-of-treating-hepatitis-c-in-hcc-patients-before-transplant

Friday, November 11, 2016

HCV and Alcoholism: How Two Diseases and Their Treatments Go Hand-In-Hand

http://www.healio.com/hepatology/news/print/hcv-next
Feature

HCV and Alcoholism: How Two Diseases and Their Treatments Go Hand-In-Hand

HCV Next offers information on a range of liver topics including diagnosis, new combination therapies, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the November print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.

Table of Contents
5 Questions
A Conversation With Sammy Saab, MD, MPH







Begin here....

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

HCV Next - Chipping Away at Medicaid Restrictions to DAA Coverage

HCV NEXT May Issue

Chipping Away at Medicaid Restrictions to DAA Coverage

"HCV Next" offers information on a range of topics, which include diagnosis, new combination therapies, side effects, drug/drug interaction, guidelines, practice management issues, to name a few.

The following articles appeared in the May print edition of HCV NEXT, provided online at Healio.

Table of Contents

5 Questions
A Conversation with Anthony Martinez, MD
Cover Story
In this issue, HCV Next asks five questions of Anthony Martinez, MD, clinical associate professor at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at University at Buffalo.

Cover Story
A recent Notice from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services outlined policies surrounding coverage and access to hepatitis C drugs for Medicaid beneficiaries. The authors were sympathetic to ongoing concerns about the high cost of direct-acting antiviral therapies and expressed cautious optimism that market forces will ultimately drive those costs down.

Editorial
With more than 10,000 attendees and a record-breaking number of presentation submissions, 2016’s International Liver Congress offered much support of our current knowledge of hepatitis C virus along with small, ground breaking studies in areas of need.

Meeting News Coverage
Liver Societies Pledge Solidarity in the Elimination of Viral Hepatitis
“The joint statement I have just received is groundbreaking and constitutes a pivotal movement. This conference will be remembered for when elimination of viral hepatitis was embraced,” Gottfried Hirnschall, MD, MPH, director of the HIV/AIDS department and global hepatitis program at the World Health Organization, said during the general session. “This means that the thousands of hepatologists, clinicians and experts who are members of the four organizations will be ambassadors of eliminating hepatitis in your own countries.”
The recommended guidelines are geared toward policy-makers in low- and middle-income countries who formulate country-specific treatment guidelines and who plan infectious disease treatment programs and services, as well as clinicians responsible for providing treatment, according to the guidelines. They are intended to promote the “scale-up of HCV treatment”, more specifically among people in low- and middle-income countries, where very few have access to these new treatments.

The Big Picture
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most common causes of liver disease in developed countries with an estimated prevalence of 30% and 33% in the United States and European populations, respectively. After excluding significant alcohol consumption and other secondary causes of steatosis (ie, medications), NAFLD can be defined by the presence of hepatic steatosis identified by either imaging or histology.

HCV Next board members and experts in attendance offered varying viewpoints on the data presented. Co-Chief Medical Editor, Ira M. Jacobson, MD, chair of the department of medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City; Zobair Younossi, MD, MPH, chairman of the department of medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, and vice president for research of Inova Health System; Eric J. Lawitz, MD, vice president of scientific and research development at The Texas Liver Institute and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center; and Jordan J. Feld, MD, MPH, associated professor of medicine and research director of gastroenterology at the Toronto Centre for Liver Disease and HCV Next Editorial Board member shared their insights into the most compelling data and topics discussed at this year’s meeting.