Showing posts with label video. Show all posts
Showing posts with label video. Show all posts

Monday, June 18, 2018

Hepatitis C Weekend Video: NASH What Is It?


Weekend Video
Welcome, this weekend we have a few articles on a "silent" but potentially serious condition called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), with a new seven part video series on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the most severe form of NAFLD.

Today, while the burden of liver disease from HCV decreases - lowering the number of patients waiting or undergoing liver transplant - the waitlist for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has increased. In addition, NASH is the Fastest Growing Cause of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Liver Transplant Candidates.

American Liver Foundation
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the build up of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol. It is normal for the liver to contain some fat. However, if more than 5% – 10% percent of the liver’s weight is fat, then it is called a fatty liver (steatosis).
Learn more, here

The Effects of Physical Exercise on Fatty Liver Disease
In people with chronic hepatitis C infection, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can contribute to and accelerate the development of fibrosis. NAFLD generally occurs in people who are overweight; obesity is key to the development of insulin resistance. For people with HCV only, weight reduction leads to a decrease in steatosis and liver enzymes, and also to an improvement in fibrosis, despite persistence of the virus. Previous research also indicates HCV patients who participated in a diet and exercise program lowered their grade of steatosis and remarkably their fibrosis score, according to a study published in Nutrition 2013. Whether you have fatty liver disease, HCV or both, click on this recent article; The Effects of Physical Exercise on Fatty Liver Disease, published in Gene Expression 2018, to learn more about the effects of exercise on NAFLD and NASH.

2016
NAFLD & Type 2 Diabetes 
Published in World J Gastroenterology 2016
"NAFLD is most prominently linked to chronic kidney disease, mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease, as well as a number of other severe chronic diseases. These findings demonstrate that NAFLD ranks amongst the most serious public health problems of our time."
Also noted in the article, prevalence of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) in people who are obese and have type 2 diabetes may be as high as 40%, whereas it is less than 5% in people without type 2 diabetes.
Read the article, here.

2018
NAFLD Is a Growing Problem
NAFLD is the most common form of liver disease in Western countries.[4] Men are affected more than women.[5] Persons with a "high body mass index in late adolescence" are at risk for advanced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)..

The term "NAFLD" describes both hepatic steatosis with hepatocyte fat accumulation in a liver lacking inflammation, whereas NASH is associated with fat accumulation, hepatic inflammation, and hepatocyte injury with or without fibrosis or cirrhosis..

Not every patient with NAFLD is obese. Seven percent of lean patients have NAFLD,[18] especially in the presence of metabolic syndrome.[19] Lean patients with fatty liver also are observed among those with polycystic ovary syndrome.[20] Compared with lean patients, obese patients with NAFLD are more likely to have greater fibrosis and a worse clinical prognosis.[21] Nonobese patients with NAFLD have a lower prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and steatohepatitis than obese patients[22] but remain at risk for development of advanced liver disease[23] and associated metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular disease.[22] 
Continue reading @ Medscape
Free registration may be required. 

2017
The International Liver Congress 2017
NASH: It's Fibrosis, Not Fat, that Matters
Analysis sheds new light on what drives disease progression
AMSTERDAM -- It isn't fat but rather fibrosis that drives disease progression in people with advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a researcher said here
Continue reading....
Free registration may be required. 

2017
HCV & Steatosis
Given the development of steatosis is well-known in people with HCV, the following articles may be of interest to you, lets start with an article published in Clinical Liver Disease 2017; Metabolic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus
Out of excessive consumption, steatosis should be classified into 2 types according to hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes: metabolic steatosis, which is associated with features of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in patients infected with nongenotype 3, and viral steatosis, which is correlated with viral load and hyperlipemia in patients infected with genotype 3.
Download the article, here

2016
Published in the 2016 issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences; NAFLD and NASH in HCV Infection: Prevalence and Significance in Hepatic and Extrahepatic Manifestations, researchers investigated factors associated with NAFLD/NASH in chronic HCV, and the role of “viral steatosis” associated with HCV genotype 3 infection. 

2018
Of Interest
HCV Treatment Genotype 3
The International Liver Congress, 2018
Treatment for hepatitis C genotype 3 infection can be completed in 8 weeks in people without cirrhosis, three real-world studies presented at the conference confirmed. 

2018
Fatty liver is very common in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients post-SVR 
According to data published March 21, 2018 in the online journal World J Gastroenterology, evidence of steatosis was reported to be found in close to half of patients who achieve a sustained virologic response after treating with direct-acting antivirals. 
Core tip: This is the first prospective study to assess the prevalence of fatty liver in hepatitis C patients who have achieved a sustained virological response with direct-acting antivirals. The study’s findings that fatty liver is present in 47.5% of these patients and that some steatotic patients have clinically significant fibrosis despite normal liver enzymes should raise awareness of the post-sustained virological response (SVR) prevalence of fatty liver and the importance of post-SVR assessment of steatosis and fibrosis and long-term follow up with these patients.
Full-text, here

2018
NASH Leading Cause of Liver Transplant in Women
"NASH is currently the second leading cause for LT waitlist registration/liver transplantation overall, and in females, the leading cause. Given the rate of increase, NASH will likely rise to become the leading indication for LT in males as well" according to a June 2018 study published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

June 2018
On June 12, 2018, the 1st International NASH Day was launched by The NASH Education Program, along with their seven part educational program to help patients understand this serious liver disease. Listen to expert interviews, learn about symptoms, non-invasive tests used to measure liver inflammation and fibrosis, and hear from patients struggling with the disease.


NASH What Is It?
The video is the first part of a WEBTV of 7 sequences about NASH
Published June 12, 2018
Speakers: Pr Stephen Harrison, Pr Sven Francque
In this first TV show you will understand – thanks to a worldwide overview – how little-known NASH is and why this situation has to be changed. Liver experts will go over non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) details, its mechanisms, consequences, symptoms and stigmas. These will also be highlighted by a patient testimony at the end of the video footage.

Part One



SUBTITLES ARE AVAILABLE IN 6 LANGUAGES, using settings of the video (Gear Icon at the bottom right of the video): English - Spanish - French - Italian - German - Portugese

Full Playlist:
PART 1 NASH What Is It?  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND3AV...
In this first TV show you will understand – thanks to a worldwide overview – how little-known NASH is and why this situation has to be changed. Liver experts will go over non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) details, its mechanisms, consequences, symptoms and stigmas. These will also be highlighted by a patient testimony at the end of the video footage.

PART 2 NASH How Common Is It?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luYVh...
In this second TV show, you will understand how widespread NASH is, with prevalence figures and future projections exposed. During the interviews, livers experts will bring up information on NASH frequency, genetic predispositions, how children are now subject to this preventable disease, and which populations are most commonly affected.

PART 3 NASH: Who is at risk?  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAjMR...
In this third TV show, you will discover that NASH is much more than just a liver disease and that it is related to metabolic disorders – such as diabetes and obesity – and closely linked to modern lifestyles: unhealthy diets and lack of physicial activity. The diverse speaker panel will explain why some people are more at risk than others and how much exercise can help, if sufficient and sustained. Lastly, the video will follow patients associations in their mobilizations against NASH.

PART 4 NASH: Getting Diagnosed 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_nwF...
In this fourth TV show, you will discover how much of challenge NASH diagnosis is – mainly because NASH is a silent disease (no symptoms) which makes it difficult to diagnose – and how current procedures can be a bottleneck in the patient journey. Liver experts will explain the current invasive and non-invasive diagnostic techniques used when NASH is suspected, as well as latest research in novel diagnostic tools and what the future holds in terms of diagnosis.

PART 5 NASH: Disease evolution and consequences  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sl9Fu...
In this fifth TV show, you will learn more about the consequences of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in the liver, but also in the rest of the body, with associated conditions. A French sports journalist will share his testimony as a NASH patient that overcame a liver transplant and a kidney as the last resort to survive, and a representative from The Liver Forum will explain how experts work to research the best patient clinical management solutions. In the end, you will know more about the consequences on health, the consequences on the economy, stigmas, lessons learned and the dire need for awareness.

PART 6 NASH: Patient care and clinical management 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWS-c...
In this sixth video, you will discover how much of a challenge patient management is, and especially, how to answer this burning question: “how can we care for patients in the absence of treatment?” – Today, on top of the lifestyle change (weight loss and exercise) ongoing research on therapeutic solutions paves the way for a better patient care. Moreover, you’ll discover how physicians are all working hand in hand to cover all the aspects of this multi-faceted disease. Finally, you will have the opportunity to hear the American Liver Foundation’s CEO’s perspectives on NASH.

PART 7 NASH: What perspectives?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDt5k...
In this seventh video, you will learn more about the next key challenges in the field of NASH, and about the crucial need for awareness and for public policy. Experts will give some forecast about NASH, ongoing research and the shed light on future management solutions You will get insights on the economic burden of NASH and the need for all stakeholders to be involved in NASH awareness. To conclude these seven sequences, there will be a special focus on how street art can help increase awareness and what we can hope for in the future.

Elsewhere
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: risks, prevention, and more
June 11, 2018
Lauren Phinney
Doctor Rohit Loomba appeared on KUSI News in San Diego to discuss Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and how to prevent it. 
Watch his informative interview here.

The diagnosis and management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Practice guidance from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases
A recent publication from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) provides guidance for the evaluation and management of patients with NAFLD.
This guidance provides a data‐supported approach to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) care. A “Guidance” document is different from a “Guideline.” Guidelines are developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts and rate the quality (level) of the evidence and the strength of each recommendation using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment Development, and Evaluation system. A guidance document is developed by a panel of experts in the topic, and guidance statements, not recommendations, are put forward to help clinicians understand and implement the most recent evidence. 

On This Blog 

Maybe this weekend you might think about eating right or even start walking, two key elements for keeping your liver healthy. 
Tina

Monday, June 4, 2018

DDW 2018 - Is an HCV cure rate of 100 percent realistic?

DDW News | Jun 4, 2018 | 2018, AASLD, DDW Daily News, Monday Issue 2018, Watch Videos

David E. Bernstein, MD, FAASLD, discusses the possibility of an HCV cure rate of 100%

Is an HCV cure rate of 100 percent realistic?
David E. Bernstein, MD, FAASLD, wants to break down the barriers preventing access to curative therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although antiviral therapy has led to a cure rate of more than 90 percent of HCV cases, Dr. Bernstein thinks more can be done to increase the cure rate.

In this DDW Daily News video exclusive, he discusses several obstacles preventing patients’ access to curative therapies, including cost concerns, public policy issues and insurance variations that have led to different state rules and regulations. Dr. Bernstein also addresses the benefits of HCV therapy and whether it’s possible to eradicate HCV and achieve 100 percent cure rate.

“It’s the only viral disease that we can actually cure, but from a public policy standpoint a significant portion of our population does not have access to these life-changing and curative therapies for unclear reasons,” says Dr. Bernstein, director of the Sandra Atlas Bass Center for Liver Diseases at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, East Garden City, NY.
Video:
http://blog.ddw.org/is-an-hcv-cure-rate-of-100-percent-realistic/

Links
Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018 June 2-5, 2018
Website - Digestive Disease Week® (DDW)
DDW Blog
DDW Daily News
On Twitter - #DDW18

Monday, May 7, 2018

Watch - The Truth about Hepatitis C Treatment long term Side Effects

Karen Hoyt is devoted to offering support and accurate information to people coping with the effects of liver disease through a series of informative videos, topics include ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and other liver-related complications.

Latest Video:
May 6, 2018

All Videos
View Karen's YouTube channel.

Blog
Karen shares her own journey living with cirrhosis and liver cancer, to the emotional ups and downs of her lifesaving liver transplant. If you haven't found Karen yet, she is a master at providing patient-friendly diet and lifestyle tips for liver disease patients, filling a much needed void for people living with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and fatty liver disease. Visit her blog: I Help C.

The Liver Loving Diet
To help guide you through a well-balanced diet, which is essential to help fight or curtail liver damage, Karen published: The Liver Loving Diet. The book is a labor of love, a huge undertaking for someone dealing with Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE), a serious disorder that can happen without warning if you have advanced liver disease, causing confusion, brain fatigue (brain fog) and problems with hand movements, making concentration and typing difficult. Get to know Karen better by reading an excerpt from her book: Emergency Room Diagnosis with Liver Cirrhosis.

Of Interest
HCV Advocate
Weekly Special: HCV Treatment Side Effect Management

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Watch - Liver Congress™ 2018 - First Press Conference HEPAHEALTH Project Report

The International Liver Congress™ 2018 (ILC) - Press Conference 1

First official press conference of The ILC 2018 in Paris, France, chaired by EASL Governing Board member Prof Massimo Pinzani on Wednesday, 11 April 2018.

This press conference highlighted the HEPAHEALTH Project Report.
Twitter #Hepahealth


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPkg2zy1QYo

HEPAHEALTH Project Report -- risk factors and the burden of liver disease in Europe and selected Central Asian countries
11 April 2018, Paris, France: The HEPAHEALTH Project Report, which was presented today in a press conference at The International Liver Congress trade; 2018 in Paris, France, is the second overview commissioned by EASL on the burden of liver disease in Europe. The report encompasses 35 countries in total: the EU region, Iceland, Kazakhstan, Norway, Russia, Serbia, Switzerland and Uzbekistan.

The aims of the report were to: report on the latest epidemiological burden of liver disease in the wider European region; present the data on the main risk factors for liver disease; and, carry out a review of review on public health interventions.

Since EASL published its first overview in 2013, the situation has not improved. In particular, liver cancer mortality has increased and only a few countries have seen a decrease or even a stabilisation in rates since 1980.

The European region is the highest consumer of alcoholic beverages in the world and efforts to reduce alcohol consumption are stalling in many countries. Likewise, rates of obesity have risen across almost every country the report surveyed since 2013 and the rates of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) are increasing accordingly. In Southern and Eastern Europe viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver disease mortality.

Two key points stand out in the findings of the report: 

Liver disease kills early: Two thirds of all potential years of life lost due to liver disease were working years of life. This contrasts with other diseases, such as stroke, where the majority of deaths occur after the age of 65.

A geographical and income divide: Liver disease mortality has decreased across Western and Central Europe since 1970. Most of the countries with high stable or increasing rates of liver disease are located in the poorer parts of the European Union and the countries of the former Soviet Union. The UK and Finland deviate from the rest of Western European and Nordic trends: Both countries have seen steep increases in liver disease mortality since 1970.

What needs to be done? 

Vaccinations for Hepatitis B virus and screening of blood products across the EU since the early 1990s has helped to drastically reduce the number of HBV infections. Better harm reduction policies and micro-elimination strategies must be implemented across the region if there is to be an impact on Hepatitis C Virus infection rates. -The new generation of direct acting antivirals will largely eliminate cases of HCV provided that governments ensure that all patients who need them have access to treatment.

It is clear that prevention is the key to reducing other liver diseases, particularly for alcohol and obesity related liver disease where effective treatments do not exist or are not very effective. European countries must do more to promote a reduction in alcohol consumption and to reduce levels of obesity. The European Union and its member states used to be a world leader in progressive public health policies: It is time for them to get back in the saddle and save another generation from liver disease.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/eaft-hpr041218.php

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Watch - Liver Cancer in patients with HCV



liverfoundation2010
Published on Feb 7, 2018
An American Liver Foundation Webinar Program
This webinar will discuss HCC (primary liver cancer) in patients with HCV, tests for diagnosis, risk for HCC after SVR, and which patients should undergo surveillance for HCC. 



Thursday, November 9, 2017

Six Episode Series - New "Hepatitis C Virus: Dealing With Chronic Disease"

Six Episode Series from Medscape TV - Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat

November 8, 2017 
Patients with advanced disease will need help beyond current therapy, including managing comorbidities and navigating transplant.

October 10, 2017
EPISODE 4 - The New Regimens
Liver specialists find that HCV patients who have comorbid conditions and treatment-resistant disease may still be candidates for combination therapies.

August 17, 2017
EPISODE 3 - Hope and Uncertainty

July 17, 2017
EPISODE 2 - Considerations Before HCV Therapy

June 21, 2017
EPISODE 1 - Strides and Obstacles

Coming Soon
Episode 6 - Strategies for Prevention
Free registration may be required

Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat
In the past few years, a new class of direct-acting antiviral agents has made the treatment of HCV easier and more effective than ever before, with cure rates nearing 100%, even among HIV-positive patients. But not all patients with HCV who are eligible for antiviral treatment are identified, and even fewer are being referred for care. Thus, HCV infection remains a significant risk for progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver specialists at two prestigious Chicago medical centers confront the key issues in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

HCV Support Online - Watch Stories Shared By People Affected By HCV

Video Vignettes: Through Their Own Lens: Hepatitis C Virus Liver Disease
October 24, 2017
Roughly 3 to 4 million people in the US are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). And 75% of them are Baby Boomers. Thirty-five to 40% of liver transplants in the US are the result of HCV cirrhosis. 

We continue our Video Vignettes series by introducing you to a member of the American Liver Foundation Support Community on Inspire who is living with a liver transplant caused by HCV. If you or a loved one has liver disease, go to inspire.com and join the American Liver Foundation Support Community on Inspire.



Support Online
American Liver Foundation Support Community on Inspire.
Liver disease support group and discussion community.

View All: Video Vignettes in this series

Additional Online Support - Message Boards
Hep Forums
Hep C Warriors
Hep C Discussion Forum
Hepatitis Central
Transplant Friends

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Overcoming Obstacles in HCV 2017: Experts discuss treating and testing updates

In Case You Missed It - Launched Last Month @ ViralEd.




Experts discuss HCV treating and testing updates in this straightforward and easy to understand program, available online at ViralEd.

Follow case-based modules featuring the following topics: 

Topics
Risk Factors and Prevention
Testing, Guidelines and Recommendations
Risks for Acute HCV
Pre-Treatment Management
Management of Chronic HCV
Post-Treatment Patient Management

Begin here.......

Monday, September 11, 2017

HCC Surveillance: A Roadmap For Improving Value in Patients with Cirrhosis

HCC Surveillance: A Roadmap For Improving Value in Patients with Cirrhosis

A Division of Liver Medicine Grand Rounds presented by Amit G. Singal, MD, MS, Associate Professor of Medicine; Medical Director, Liver Tumor Program, Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, UT Southwestern Medical Center




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKNLe44vF9s&t=45s

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Hepatitis C Medscape TV -  Hope and Uncertainty

Medscape TV - Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat

August 17, 2017
SEASON 1  

July 17, 2017

June 21, 2017
EPISODE 1 - Strides and Obstacles

Six Episode Series
In the past few years, a new class of direct-acting antiviral agents has made the treatment of HCV easier and more effective than ever before, with cure rates nearing 100%, even among HIV-positive patients. But not all patients with HCV who are eligible for antiviral treatment are identified, and even fewer are being referred for care. Thus, HCV infection remains a significant risk for progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver specialists at two prestigious Chicago medical centers confront the key issues in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

Coming Soon
Episode 4 - New Regimens
Episode 5 - Dealing With Chronic Disease
Episode 6 - Strategies for Prevention
Free registration may be required

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Watch ASCEND Documentary: Patients, Providers, and Hepatitis C

The ASCEND Documentary - An inside view of Hepatitis C treatment in an urban community health care setting

Abstract
The ASCEND study has been published in the Annals of internal medicine: Expansion of Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Task Shifting to Community-Based Nonspecialist Providers: A Nonrandomized Clinical Trial.

Full Text 
Expansion of Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Task Shifting to Community-Based Nonspecialist Providers
A Nonrandomized Clinical Trial
Sarah Kattakuzhy, MD; Chloe Gross, RN; Benjamin Emmanuel, MPH; Gebeyehu Teferi, MD; Veronica Jenkins, MD; Rachel Silk, RN, MPH; Elizabeth Akoth, RN, MS; Aurielle Thomas, BA; Charisse Ahmed, BS; Michelle Espinosa; Angie Price, CRNP; Elana Rosenthal, MD; Lydia Tang, MD; Eleanor Wilson, MD, MS; Soren Bentzen, PhD; Henry Masur, MD; Shyam Kottilil, MD, PhD; and the ASCEND Providers*
Full text PDF tweeted via @HenryEChang

Follow On Twitter
I highly suggest you follow Henry E. Chang on Twitter if you are interested in reading full text articles about the treatment and management of hepatitis C.

Aug 10, 2017 Provided by NATAP 
Expansion of Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Task Shifting to Community-Based Nonspecialist Providers: A Nonrandomized Clinical Trial - ASCEND Study - (08/10/17)

Follow On Twitter @JulesLevin1      



Aug 10, 2017
Provided by - InstHumanVirology

Friday, July 21, 2017

Medscape TV - Episode 2: Considerations Before HCV Therapy

Medscape TV - Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat

July 17, 2017

June 21, 2017
EPISODE 1 - Strides and Obstacles

Six Episode Series
In the past few years, a new class of direct-acting antiviral agents has made the treatment of HCV easier and more effective than ever before, with cure rates nearing 100%, even among HIV-positive patients. But not all patients with HCV who are eligible for antiviral treatment are identified, and even fewer are being referred for care. Thus, HCV infection remains a significant risk for progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver specialists at two prestigious Chicago medical centers confront the key issues in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

Coming Soon
Episode 3 - Hope and Uncertainty
Episode 4 - New Regimens
Episode 5 - Dealing With Chronic Disease
Episode 6 - Strategies for Prevention
Free registration may be required

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Opioid Prescriptions Falling But Remain Too High, CDC Says

July 2017
CDC - Opioid Prescribing



Health News From NPR

Opioid Prescriptions Falling But Remain Too High, CDC Says
In a new report, the CDC says U.S. doctors are prescribing fewer opioids than they were in 2010, but that overall rates remain high.

The U.S. is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Millions of Americans are addicted to the powerful prescription painkillers, and tens of thousands are dying each year from overdoses.

A new report out Thursday offers a bit of hope: Doctors are prescribing opioids less often, and the average dose they're giving patients has dropped, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

However, the number of patients getting opioids is still too high, and doctors are giving their patients prescriptions that last longer, according to the report in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Continue reading....

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Medscape New HCV Video Series - Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat

Medscape - New Video Series
Hepatitis C Perspective

Hepatitis C Virus: Containing the Threat
About this Series
In the past few years, a new class of direct-acting antiviral agents has made the treatment of HCV easier and more effective than ever before, with cure rates nearing 100%, even among HIV-positive patients. But not all patients with HCV who are eligible for antiviral treatment are identified, and even fewer are being referred for care. Thus, HCV infection remains a significant risk for progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver specialists at two prestigious Chicago medical centers confront the key issues in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection.

View: Episode 1/ Strides and Obstacles

Coming Soon


Begin here
Follow On Twitter

Friday, May 19, 2017

Watch Dr. Douglas Dieterich - Importance of Hepatitis C Screening and Treatment



Importance of Hepatitis C Screening and Treatment
Health Power for Minorities
Published on May 18, 2017

Dr. Douglas Dieterich, Director of The Institute for Liver Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City and Bob Rice, who was cured of chronic hepatitis C after medical treatment and a liver transplant, discuss the importance of hepatitis C screening and treatment with Health Power's president, Dr. Norma Goodwin.

The fact that hepatitis C is now curable is a major medical accomplishment because "hep C" without treatment is linked to cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer and at times, even death.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Dr Gail Bridges Explains the High Real-World Cure Rate for HCV

Dr Gail Bridges Explains the High Real-World Cure Rate for HCV

Real-world results for hepatitis C drugs have been very closely aligned to the clinical trial outcomes, which is likely due to a combination of factors, such as the effectiveness of the agents and better knowledge of using direct-acting antivirals, according to Gail Bridges, PharmD, of Accredo Health.

Source - http://www.ajmc.com/conferences/amcp-2017/dr-gail-bridges-explains-the-high-real-world-cure-rate-for-hcv

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Hepatitis C Education for the Public: 31 Days of Wellness


Dr. Joseph Galati discusses a recent presentation on hepatitis C, explaining risk factors for hepatitis C, new drug therapies for hepatitis C, and the complications associated with hepatitis C. These slides were presented at a recent program supported by the American Liver Foundation, in Houston, Texas. New therapies are able to cure hepatitis C, and if left untreated, hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure, liver cancer, and the possible need for a liver transplant.


Thursday, July 28, 2016

David Bernstein: Managing Risk Factors in Hepatitis C

David Bernstein: Managing Risk Factors in Hepatitis C
Jul 27, 2016 | Adam Hochron
Article available @ MD Magazine   

Watch:



MD Magazine TV
Now that most forms of hepatitis C are treatable if not curable other conditions like fatty liver disease are drawing a lot of attention in the field of hepatology.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Hepatitis C and beyond: Never a dull moment



Published on Jun 13, 2016
Hepatitis C and beyond: Never a dull moment

Air date: Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 3:00:00 PM

Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

Runtime: 01:03:03

Description: NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The Annual George Khoury Lecture

From the emergence of a mystery virus associated with post-transfusion hepatitis to the discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), we are now witnessing a remarkable new era of highly effective, curative treatments. Despite this, challenges remain to effectively implement these medical advances on a national and global scale. For the molecular virologist, many questions remain unanswered. Why are clinical isolates of HCV so difficult to culture? What is the link between chronic HCV and liver cancer? Where did HCV come from and should we rest on our laurels assuming that hepacivirus-associated disease will soon vanish? These and other topics will be the subject of this Khoury lecture.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals

Author: Charles M. Rice, Ph.D., The Rockefeller University

Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?1...