Showing posts with label 2018. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 2018. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Hepatitis Awareness Month - What is hepatitis C? What about hepatitis B or A?


Featured on the blog today in honor of Hepatitis Awareness Month, is a look at three common viruses that cause hepatitis, brought to you by Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), health experts, advocates, and patient bloggers, who work hard to spread information and awareness about viral hepatitis.

Hepatitis C
Lets start with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a virus that once caused serious damage to my liver, putting me at risk for liver-related complications. The good news is after testing; it all starts with getting tested for HCV, I went on to successfully treat the virus. The bad news is close to 50% of people who have HCV have not yet been diagnosed. Why not take this opportunity to learn more about viral hepatitis, or better yet, have a long frank discussion with "yourself" about getting tested.

Young Or Not So Young - The Risk 
Today we have two different groups of people that are at risk for hepatitis C, young people who have injected drugs and well, older people. We know that the hepatitis C epidemic peaked between 1940 and 1965 due in part because of hospital transmissions caused by the practice of reusing needles. So if you are at risk for HCV, rather you are young or part of the baby boomer generation; people born between 1945 and 1965, I hope you consider getting tested for HCV.

Hepatitis C Risk Factors
-IV drug use, sharing needles and syringes; Spike in HCV Linked to Opioid Injection Hits Young Adults Hardest
-Vertical transmission from mother to baby; HCV in Pregnant Women on Rise Increased risk of HCV infected infants.
-You were born from 1945 through 1965
-Extensive surgical procedures
-Needlestick injuries in health care settings
- Recipients of donated blood, blood products, and organs (once a common means of transmission but now rare in the United States since blood screening became available in 1992)
-People who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987
-Hemodialysis patients or persons who spent many years on dialysis for kidney failure
-Other possible risk behaviors: tattoos, body piercing, living and medical care in a developing country, folk medicine, intranasal cocaine
-Sexual transmission, rare; the risk of sexual transmission to an individual is probably less than 3% when a person is in a stable monogamous relationship - Unless you also have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
-Sharing personal care items, such as razors or toothbrushes, that may have come in contact with the blood of an infected person
-Unknown--up to 5% of patients have no identifiable risk factors

May 19th is Hepatitis Testing Day! 

Are You At Risk For Viral Hepatitis?
Find out if you should get tested or vaccinated by taking a quick, online Hepatitis Risk Assessment, developed by the CDC and get a personalized report.

Hepatitis C - A Few Facts
Of every 100 people infected with hepatitis C, 75 to 85 will develop chronic disease and 10-20 will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20-30 years. Early on HCV doesn't always have noticeable symptoms but overtime and with certain co-factors the virus can lead to serious liver problems, including cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) or liver cancer. Almost 80 percent of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are due to underlying chronic hepatitis B and C infection, and 80 to 90 percent of people with HCC have liver cirrhosis. According to the recent EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines: Management of hepatocellular carcinoma; Vaccination against hepatitis B reduces the risk of HCC and is recommended for all new-borns and high-risk groups. In patients with chronic hepatitis, antiviral therapies leading to maintained HBV suppression in chronic hepatitis B and sustained viral response in hepatitis C are recommended, since they have been shown to prevent progression to cirrhosis and HCC development.

Show Me The Guidelines

Current EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines
During The International Liver Congress 2018, The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) released updated practice guidelines to help physicians, as well as patients manage and treat HCV. (Link) EASL Practice Guidelines - Hepatitis C 2018, Decompensated Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Alcoholic Liver Disease & Hepatitis E.

Current AASLD Clinical Practice Guidelines
The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) with the International Antiviral Society developed a living document with ever evolving guidelines to treat HCV. The guidelines break down treatment according to liver damage and HCV genotype, updated when new HCV drugs are approved, or new real world data is established.

Help - Where Do I Begin?

Talk To Someone
Help‑4‑Hep is a non-profit, peer-to-peer helpline where counselors work with patients to meet the challenges of hepatitis C head-on. Callers talk one-to-one with a real person, typically someone who's had hepatitis C touch their own life. And they talk about the specifics of their particular situation. The phone call, support and information are all provided free of charge. Let us help you cut through the clutter and confusion. Call toll-free: 877‑Help‑4‑Hep (877‑435‑7443).
Begin here.......

Where To Get Tested - Hepatitis C and Hepatitis B

Find A HCV Specialist 
Find a Specialist In Your Area

Hepatitis B 
More than 2 million Americans are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), to learn more about HBV visit The Hepatitis B Foundation, for patients it's the best site for easy to understand information, here are a few links to get you started: 

What Is Hepatitis B?
Facts and Figures
Symptoms
Transmission
Acute vs. Chronic Infection
Commonly Asked Questions
The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis
Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B
Hepatitis Delta Coinfection
Hepatitis C Coinfection
HIV/AIDS Coinfection

AASLD 2018 hepatitis B guidance
Update on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ACIP Hepatitis B Vaccine Recommendations | CDC
You may have questions about the hepatitis A virus (HAV) after reading about HAV outbreaks across the US; Michigan, California, Indiana, Kentucky and Utah. The outbreak began in California in 2017, this year Michigan, Utah, and Kentucky have reported outbreaks with a high number of cases. Here is a Public Service Announcement from San Diego County Health & Human Services Agency on HAV prevention.


Immunization Action Coalition

Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers Information about the disease and vaccines
Read how hepatitis A is spread, the symptoms, how serious the virus is, when and who should get vaccinated.

CDC
I think I have been exposed to hepatitis A. What should I do?
If you have any questions about potential exposure to hepatitis A, call your health professional or your local or state health department. If you were recently exposed to hepatitis A virus and have not been vaccinated against hepatitis A, you might benefit from an injection of either immune globulin or hepatitis A vaccine. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure. A health professional can decide what is best based on your age and overall health.

What is postexposure prophylaxis (PEP)?
Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) refers to trying to prevent or treat a disease after an exposure. For hepatitis A, postexposure prophylaxis is an injection of either immune globulin or hepatitis A vaccine. However, the vaccine or immune globulin are only effective in preventing hepatitis A if given within the first 2 weeks after exposure.
Begin here.......

Blog Updates: The ABCs Of Viral Hepatitis

Swedish Medical Center
What is hepatitis C, and how does it differ from hepatitis A or B?
By 2030, the World Health Organization wants to have hepatitis C eliminated from the planet. A key to reaching that goal is to create awareness of the disease among baby boomers, who suffer from it in larger numbers compared to the rest of the population, as well as those with increased lifestyle risks. But what is hepatitis C, and what can be done to reduce its numbers? Kris Kowdley, MD, director of the Liver Care Network and Organ Care Research at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, WA, discusses hepatitis C in detail.
View the article here: https://www.swedish.org/blog/2018/05/ask-the-expert-all-about-hepatitis-c

HEP Blogs
Go-to online source for educational and social support for people living with hepatitis. The website is devoted to combating the stigma and isolation surrounding hepatitis.

What are the Different Types of Hepatitis?
May 9, 2018 • By Connie M. Welch
Viral hepatitis is a liver infection that causes inflammation and damage. There are 5 viruses that cause viral hepatitis, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A and E viruses can cause acute infections (infections that last less than 6 months). Hepatitis B, C, and D viruses can cause acute and chronic (lasting longer than 6 months and typically ongoing) liver infections.

Awareness
Get Organized for Hepatitis Awareness Month 
By Lucinda K. Porter, RN
Raising hepatitis awareness is a great deal more fun if you participate with others. Here are some tips.


HepatitisC.net
Hep C Daily Blog, Experts & Community

By Karen Hoyt · May 7, 2018
So, you are hanging out with the same crowd that you always have. They’re like your family. In many ways, they are closer to you than your own family.

The Fallout Guide for Hep C: Support Network
By Rick Nash · May 2, 2018
I am lucky after my transplant, I carry that reminder on my stomach. Because when someone hears you have a condition, they may not initially understand the reality of how that affects you.
This is part two of a six-part series, view part one here.

All updates: https://hepatitisc.net/community/

Hep B Blog
The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide.

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month
Hepatitis Awareness Month is dedicated to increasing awareness of hepatitis in the United States and to encourage high risk populations to get tested. If you’re not sure how you can get involved in the hepatitis B community this month, here are some ways you can!

Information On Hep B Blog:
Hepatitis B Diagnosis & Monitoring
Hepatitis B Prevention
Hepatitis B Treatment
Liver Cancer
Living with Hepatitis B
News

    Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation
    The Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides resources, education and information related to screening, the prevention of and treatment for the Hepatitis Virus and Liver Cancer.

    A New York Post article about an unsafe “pizza joint manager” — who was reported to have sparked hepatitis C scare — made a few rounds on the panicked social media circuit earlier this year.


    Healio
    Healio features the industry’s best news reporting, dynamic multimedia, question-and-answer columns, CME and other educational activities in a variety of formats, quick reference content, blogs, and peer-reviewed journals. A quick free registration may be required.

    Hepatitis Awareness Month: 10 recent reports on viral hepatitis
    May 8, 2018
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have designated May as Hepatitis Awareness Month to raise public awareness of viral hepatitis including the most common strains: hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Additionally, the CDC designated May 19th as Hepatitis Testing Day. The following recent reports, many from recent meetings including the International Liver Congress 2018, include new research data on hepatitis prevalence and outbreaks, transmission risks and treatment outcomes...

    May 9, 2018
    Physicians should consider administering hepatitis A vaccines to their patients with hepatitis B and those with hepatitis C, according to a…

    Viral Hepatitis - An Overview
    By Osmosis
    What is the hepatitis virus? Well, the hepatitis virus invades liver cells and causes inflammation in the liver tissue. There are five known hepatitis viruses—hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, hepatitis D, and hepatitis E, all of which have slightly different presentations, symptoms and severity.


    Do you want to know your status? If you fall under any of the above mentioned risk groups please consider getting tested.

    Tina

    Monday, January 1, 2018

    Hepatitis C 2018 - Its A New Year

    Here's what new in the world of HCV in 2018
    Offered on this page is research updates with a focus on treating HCV according to genotype using FDA approved and investigational medicines. Information is extracted from news articles, peer-reviewed journals, as well as liver meetings/conferences, research manuscripts and interactive learning activities.



    Of Interest