Friday, June 17, 2016

Prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations of Hepatitis C

Prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations of Hepatitis C

This month's issue of Gastroenterology reviews the prevalence, quality of life, and economic burden of extrahepatic manifestations of Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis C virus infection has hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations with various costs and impairments to health-related quality of life.

Dr Zobair Younossi and colleagues from Virginia, USA performed a meta-analysis to determine the prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations in patients with HCV infection, how these impair HRQL, and their costs.

The researchers performed systematic reviews of the literature using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database, from 1996 through 2014.

The research team identified studies of the following extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection: mixed cryoglobulinemia, chronic kidney or end-stage renal disease, type 2 diabetes, B-cell lymphoma, lichen planus, Sj√∂gren’s syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda, rheumatoid-like arthritis, or depression.

The researchers performed a separate meta-analysis for each condition to determine prevalence rates of extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection and their effects on health-related quality of life.
The team determined the annual costs associated with extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection.

In an analysis of data from 102 studies, the research team found the most common extrahepatic manifestations to be diabetes, and depression.

HRQL data showed that HCV infection had negative effects on overall physical and mental health.

The research team found that total direct medical costs of extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection, in 2014 US dollars, were estimated to be $1506 million.

Dr Younossi's team concludes, "In a systematic review and meta-analysis we determined the prevalence, risks, and costs associated with extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection."
"These estimates should be added to the liver-related burden of disease to obtain a more accurate assessment of the total burden of chronic HCV infection."

"Prospective, real-world studies are needed to increase our understanding of the total clinical and economic effects of HCV infection and treatment on patients and society."

Gastroenterol 2016: 150(7): 1599–1608
17 June 2016


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